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Thread: White scrolling lines on Jakks Pacific Namco Plug and Play after 6V power supply mod

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    Default White scrolling lines on Jakks Pacific Namco Plug and Play after 6V power supply mod

    The one thing that always bothered me about Jakks Pacific Plug and Plays is that you can't use a power supply on the units. This is the Plug and Play I have:



    Jakks Pacific's first(at least what I presume is the first) Namco Plug and Play. I have added a 6V power supply input wired up for power supplies with center negative polarity, and while it works, there's something wrong and I can't figure it out. The problem is that I get thick white horizontal lines on the screen that scroll from top to bottom. Now, usually, this is a grounding issue, and I've experienced this with a Super Joy III Famicom-in-a-Nintendo-64-controller thing, but unlike the Super Joy III, the Namco Plug and Play just WILL NOT WORK without those stupid horizontal lines. And it only occurs when I have a power supply plugged in. With batteries, there are no lines. So what's the problem? Why am I getting those vertical lines?

    By the way, the power supply in question is one of those multi-voltage power supplies with switchable polarity. I have it set to DC 6V with center negative. Power supply is capable of 300mA, and what I don't get is that it works perfectly fine on my Radica Genesis Plug and Plays, but on my Jakks Pacific Namco Plug and Play, there are 2 thick white horizontal bars that scroll down the screen.

    Now, Jakks Pacific sells a power supply you can put into the battery compartment to power their Plug and Plays: http://www.amazon.com/Jakks-Pacific-.../dp/B000809OUO

    But if you look at the product description where it says "from the manufacturer:", it reads: "For use with all TV Games brand controllers. Input 120V AC, Output 8V DC, Ideal to be used with DC 6V power consumption device."

    So what does this mean? Am I undervolting the system by setting my power supply to 6V? Jakks Pacific uses an 8V power supply, and when I lower the voltage on my power supply, the lines become even more visible. I don't trust feeding anything greater than 6V into my Namco Plug and Play, so tell me, what's the problem? A grounding issue or voltage problems? What I really don't get is why this only occurs with a power supply and not with batteries. 4 AA batteries provide 6V, so why doesn't my power supply work right on the damn thing?

    EDIT: Apparently, the 8V thing is a mistake. The power supply outputs 6V according to the package of the power supply. It even has a max current rating of 200mA. So all I have to say now is WTF?
    Last edited by Ace; 08-01-2010 at 06:37 PM.
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    It seems that those 6V are badly regulated, or not at all.

    Have a (half-decent) multimeter? Measure AC-RMS on the supply terminals, when the device is ON. I suspect there is some voltage fluctuation.

    If true, it can be resolved with something like a 1000µF capacitor at the device supply input.

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    How exactly do I measure AC-RMS on a multimeter? I do have a multimeter but I have no idea what AC-RMS is. I did check the voltage of the power supply with no load and it's over 10V, so probably the regulation is not very good. And how would I mount the capacitor? From the 6V input to Ground or from the 6V input to the power switch on the Plug and Play(the positive terminal of the battery compartment is wired straight to the power switch)?

    NOTE: The same thing happens at 4.5V, which is still sufficient to run the Plug and Play.

    EDIT: The highest-value capacitor I have lying around is 470uF. Would this be sufficient?
    Last edited by Ace; 08-01-2010 at 09:48 PM.
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    V~, VAC... Something like that, remember that you should have the transformer loaded.

    The cap is to be connected in parallel: + terminal on the + voltage rail and - terminal on the - voltage rail.

    470µF may be enough, if not you can add more in parallel. Make sure that the voltage rating of them is above 10V.

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    Okay, I've installed the 470uF capacitor on my Plug and Play, and the lines are still there, but they're much less visible. I guess I'll either need to change my power supply or replace the capacitor with one that's got a stronger uF rating. Jorge, will changing the power supply do anything to help with the lines?
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    Depends on the power supply filtering capacitor. On regular transformer supplies, the capacitor value is usually directly proportional to the current rating of the supply.

    For the same amount of current, bigger cap = better line noise filtering.


    On the other hand switched mode power supplies (SMPS) dont follow the «bigger cap = better filter» rule.
    They also have much better regulation and filtering, are lighter, have better amperage ratings and are much more efficient.


    My suggestion is find a SMPS rated at 6V, with whatever current < 200mA.



    ----

    You may also put a series inductor on the + voltage rail with some good thickness (0.5mm or more) to further reduce noise.

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    I found this power supply: https://www.addison-electronique.com...rct53n3cdf7c01

    I doubt it's a switched mode power supply, but would this be adequate for my Jakks Pacific Plug and Play? Right now, I'm just using a universal power supply that can output 1.5V, 3V, 4.5V, 6V, 7.5V, 9V and 12V with switchable polarity rated for 300mA. I'm using the 6V setting on the power supply and center negative. My two Radica Genesis Plug and Plays show no lines when I use my universal power supply on them, but the Jakks Pacific Plug and Play does. I think the difference has to do with the fact that the Jakks Pacific Plug and Play uses a direct 6V connection while the Radica Genesis Plug and Plays drop the voltage all the way down to 3.3V, which should indicate that the power's filtered on its way to the 3.3V regulator. What if I put in a 7805 and run the Plug and Play and run it on a 9V power supply? Would that change anything?
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    I'm certain thats not SMPS, but it should have a decent filtering cap and it seems to have plenty of amperage margin for that.

    The 7805 helps removing the ripple, as along as the input voltage is always 2V above the nominal output (in this case you have to guarantee a minimum of 7V).
    But a 9V battery will drain very quickly, so its no use.

    New suggestion: use a MD or whatever power supply, use a diode bridge for polarity/AC immunity, keep that capacitor and use that 7805, or better: a 7806.

    -- EDIT --
    Oh, I see you meant a 9V AC adapter. Thats like what I said in this last suggestion.
    Last edited by Jorge Nuno; 08-04-2010 at 06:42 PM.

  9. #9
    Creator of the Mega Amp Raging in the Streets Ace's Avatar
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    I just might go the 7805 route as I have A LOT of DC 9V power supplies lying around my house. I'm using a plain 7805 to power the NOAC in my GN Twin that I just managed to repair(Player 1 controls went bust due to useless external circuitry having gone bad), and I get no lines on the screen whatsoever. But, I think I'll reverse the polarity to center positive on the Plug and Play because the spare 9V power supplies I have are center positive. And speaking of my spare power supplies, is 200mA sufficient to power the Namco Plug and Play? Or would it be a better idea to use a 300mA power supply? That Plug and Play appears to run on an NOAC, and I have an NES-only clone that's rated for DC 6V at 200mA, so I would assume I should be fine with a DC 9V 200mA power supply with a 7805 mounted in the Plug and Play.

    EDIT: Now that we're talking about different power supplies, I'm going to go a little off topic and talk about a Famiclone that suffers from power-related interference: the RetroDuo. That system has no regulator in it, instead relying on a straight 5V power supply. The problem with that clone is that the Super NES side would show 2 strips of static about as thick as the white lines on the Namco Plug and Play and no matter what I did, they just would not go away. I then tried to use the RetroDuo's 5V power supply on the Namco Plug and Play and discovered that the problem with the static on the RetroDuo was caused by the POWER SUPPLY. I got the exact same strips of static on my Namco Plug and Play, but they were MUCH worse. So I guess it would be a good idea to modify the RetroDuo to work on a 9V power supply. That should solve the static problem.
    Last edited by Ace; 08-04-2010 at 09:05 PM.
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    Well 200mA should be enough, but it has a shitty filtering cap. Of course the regulator will kill almost all ripple (if not all). It all depends on the voltage headroom, which 9V should be good enough.

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    Just added in the 7805 and ran the Namco Plug and Play no problem using my GN Twin's DC 10V 300mA power supply. Clear graphics, nice sound, and most importantly: no more lines. Now I know what to do to modify other Jakks Pacific Plug and Plays with plugs for power supplies.
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