Quantcast

Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 62

Thread: Is Tom Kalinske full of it?

  1. #1
    Outrunner JumpingRyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    737
    Rep Power
    29

    Default Is Tom Kalinske full of it?

    and by "it" I mean shit (just want to be clear).

    ROUND ONE

    I was reading The Console Wars and there is a chapter about the creation of Sonic the Hedgehog. Here is the section describing Kalinske’s first impressions of Sonic:

    Kalinske stared at the drawing, trying to see in it what Nakayama saw, but it was no use. The hedgehog looked villainous and crude, complete with sharp fangs, a spiked collar, an electric guitar, and a human girlfriend whose cleavage made Barbie’s chest look flat.



    He had been expecting a Mario-killer, but not one that literally looked like a serial killer. Maybe this Sonic could sell in Japan, but in America he belonged inside a nightmare.
    Now, keep in mind that Kalinske joined Sega in November 1990. Before that he didn’t even know what a Genesis was. So, all of this has to be taking place sometime after that.

    Here’s what Kalinske supposedly did after seeing the early Sonic:

    Day after day, Kalinske, Schroeder and Nilsen worked to turn this critter into something more than lines on a page. At first their primary focus was subtraction, removing the fangs, the collar, the guitar, and the girlfriend.
    So what’s the problem? For starters, the design of Sonic was all but finished by June 1990, when a demo of Sonic was shown at the Tokyo Toy Show. I have a scan from the August 1990 Mega Drive Fan showing some screenshots:



    As can clearly be seen from the title screen, Sonic’s design is in its final form. There are no fangs, collar, or guitar, and he certainly doesn’t look like a serial killer.

    So, can Tom Kalinske travel back in time, or is he full of shit?

    Keep in mind that Blake Harris has claimed numerous times that everything he has written has been approved by Kalinske.

    The truth: Before Kalinske was hired, Madeline Schroeder made some minor design changes to Sonic which the Sonic Team did not like. These included, according to Schroeder, removing fangs, although even the earliest surviving drawings of Sonic do not show fangs:



    The addition of Sonic’s girlfriend Madonna came at a later date and is likely the only thing that Kalinske would have been able to offer input on. As to the rock band:

    Quote Originally Posted by Yuji Naka
    But the biggest thing I remember we had that we didn't use in Sonic 1 was the break-dancing. We had this idea for the sound test. The composer for the game was one of the members of Dreams Come True, a famous Japanese band, so we wanted to do something special for the game's music. See, we wanted to have a separate sound-test screen with an animation of Sonic break-dancing while a "Sonic Band" played the game music. We were working on the images, and had enough space left on the cartridge memory for it, but once again time constraints prevented us from putting it in the program.

    So what should we do with that leftover space? I suddenly had an epiphany! It said to me ... "SE-GA!" It came from our TV commercials, and that became the game's startup sound. I thought it made a good impression when you heard it, right? Though to fit it in, we had to delete all the break-dancing picture data we had made up to that point. Oshima was heartbroken, since we didn't need his pictures anymore. But seriously, that sound alone took up 1/8 of the 4 megabit ROM! Ah, those were the days...
    http://xbox.gamespy.com/articles/654/654750p5.html

    ROUND TWO

    How many systems did Michael Katz sell in the year he was running Sega of America?

    From the interview with Kalinske on this site:

    Tom Kalinske: …the fact of the matter is that the company was not successful under Mike. You know, it’s a tough world, and changes occur when companies aren’t successful.

    Sega-16: Katz seemed to feel that Japan’s requirement that a million units be sold in a year was a lot to ask, given Sega’s market position at the time. Do you think he could have met that goal with what was being done at the time?

    Tom Kalinske: Oh, not a chance. The things I described to you, none of those were Michael Katz’s ideas.
    From Console Wars:

    Despite the shadow of Nintendo, Nakayama fully expected that Katz would be able to sell more than a million Genesis systems by the end of his first year on the job. Katz had tried his best to reach this goal and make a name for the Genesis, but after that year was up he had sold only about 350,000 units and Sega still lacked an identity.
    First of all, according to Michael Katz himself there was never a requirement of selling 1 million systems in a year, it was in 6 months:

    Sega-16: Gamers were very impressed with the leap in graphics quality the Genesis represented. Did it sell as well as expected initially, or did it take some time to gain steam?

    Michael Katz: Sega Japan set an arbitrary number for Genesis sales volume of 1 million units as a sales goal for the first 6 months. Each day I was supposed to chant Hyakumandai, which meant one million units in Japanese. We sold about 500K units — which I considered damn good — because Genesis was new, didn’t have a large, broad software library initially, the Nintendo franchise was hard to crack, Nintendo owners were waiting to see the Super Nintendo (introducing in summer ’91) and all the key retailers were not going to commit heavily until after the Nintendo introduction.
    So we have Kalinske and Blake Harris (most likely based on interviews with Kalinske) saying that Katz failed to sell 1 million systems in a year, and Katz himself saying he sold 500,000 in 6 months.

    From the April 1991 edition of Beep! MD in an interview with Naoki Aoki, a senior Sega employee:

    Beep: How well is the Genesis selling in America now?

    Aoki: By the end of last year (1990) we had sold about 1.5 million systems.
    In another article from the same edition:

    As for sales, the Genesis has sold about 1.6 or 1.7 million systems so far in the US. It’s expected to sell another 1.5 million by the end of this year.
    This agrees with sales figures found here from Famitsu which claim 3 million Genesis systems sold by March 1992.

    So, everything (aside from Kalinske and Console Wars) seems to indicate that Katz did in fact sell over 1 million systems during his year of employment from October 1989 to November 1990. That is an incredible achievement considering what Katz had to work with.

    But it’s not really surprising that Kalinske would drag Katz’s name through the mud. He had to make it clear that he was not simply building on the foundation that Katz had laid.

    I’ll conclude with a quote from Katz about a certain someone who succeeded him:

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Katz
    They ought to study their history a little better, “get a life,” and try to take credit for what they really did or didn’t do.

    Tom Kalinske – Man or Myth?

    ROUND THREE


    In Console Wars, after Kalinske personally saves Sonic by redesigning him, he is then called to a meeting with Trip Hawkins of EA. At this meeting, Kalinske negotiates the famous deal with EA after they reverse engineer the Genesis:

    “It’s the price of doing business,” Kalinske said. “Those thousands you spent on making games… what about the millions we spent making consoles? We barely break even on those systems. We’re giving away razors in order to sell the blades.”
    “But they’re my blades.”
    “Yeah, well, they’re our razors!” Kalinske shouted.

    “…here’s what we propose: Sega will grant you permission to make authorized games for the Genesis, and instead of the ten bucks for the cartridges, we’ll only charge you four.”
    “And . . . ?”
    Kalinske looked into his eyes. This really was a shakedown. In addition to the 60 percent cost reduction, Sega would also allow EA to publish up to sixteen games per year and self-manufacture their cartridges.
    Kalinske wanted more, though. He wanted Madden!

    “Actually, there’s something else that we want from you,” Kalinske said. “In exchange for keeping us out of court and saving us both from ever having to have a conversation about razors and razor blades again, I want you to give us Madden.”
    “No way!” Hawkins yelped.
    The development of Joe Montana Football had stalled, and Sega wanted to buy Madden before EA released it and re-label it as Joe Montana Football. In the end, as the story goes, Kalinske and Hawkins make a deal: EA would finish Montana using the Madden engine and get a nice share of the profits, plus they would also release Madden on their own.

    So where does it all fall apart for Mr. Kalinske’s story?

    For starters, the EA deal had already been made by the time Kalinske joined Sega in November 1990. This is a scan from the official Sega magazine, Sega Visions, from October 1990:



    That’s odd. Apparently EA had already become a third party licensee before Kalinske joined Sega. Hmm…

    And, even more, EA had even released several officially licensed games at that point: Populous and Budokan, for example.
    And, even more surprising, EA released John Madden Football on November 4, 1990!

    Of course, the evidence that Kalinske is making this all up doesn’t stop there.

    In this interview, Trip Hawkins says that EA released their first Genesis game in June 1990. Well before Kalinske even knew what a Genesis was.

    In this interview with Michael Knox of Park Place Productions, the developer who EA handed Montana to, Knox says:

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Knox
    Electronic Arts asked Park Place Productions to do the Joe Montana game for Sega. So we ended up doing the Joe Montana game in eight weeks, before Christmas, by doing it as a derivative of the original John Madden Football
    Eight weeks, before Christmas… hmm…

    The timing of all of this indicates that it was Katz or his staff who made the deal with EA, not Kalinske.

    If you are interested in learning more about the real story behind Joe Montana Football, Melf has an excellent article on it: http://www.sega-16.com/2007/11/behin...tana-football/

    What outrageous stories will I read about Kalinske next?! Stay tuned.


    The Prophet Kalinske

    ROUND FOUR


    One of Kalinske’s post-Sega claims that has probably received the most attention is that he worked out a deal to jointly develop the post-Genesis platform with Sony, and Sega of Japan shot it down. From the interview on this site:
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kalinske
    …at one point Olaf, Mickey Schulhoff (former Sony of America CEO), and I discussed that since we had such a great relationship from working on the Sega CD, why don’t we take what we’ve learned from our software developers – their input – and use it as the criteria for what the next optical platform ought to be?
    So we got all that and put it together so that it wasn’t just pure engineeringese (jargon) but something that people could understand. I remember we had a document that Olaf and Mickey took to Sony that said they’d like to develop jointly the next hardware, the next game platform, with Sega, and here’s what we think it ought to do. Sony apparently gave the green light to that. I took it to Sega of Japan and told them that this was what we thought an ideal platform would be, at least from an U.S. perspective, based on what we’ve learned from the Sega CD, and our involvement with Sony and our own people. Sega said not a chance.
    From a more recent interview:

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Kalinske
    One of the key reasons why I left Sega is when we had the opportunity to work with Sony, when [Sony Interactive CEO] Olaf Olafsson, [Sony Corporation of America president and CEO] Mickey Schulhof and I had agreed we were going to do one platform, share the development cost of it, share the probable loss for a couple years on it, but each benefit from the software we could bring to that platform. Of course, in those days, we were much better at software than they were, so I saw this as a huge win. We went to Sony and they agreed, 'Great idea.' Whether we called it Sega-Sony or Sony-Sega, who cared? We go to Sega and the board turned it down, which I thought was the stupidest decision ever made in the history of business. And from that moment on, I didn't feel they were capable of making the correct decisions in Japan any longer.
    In Console Wars, Kalinske expands on the cause of this rejection:

    “I get the strange feeling that the more successful we are in America, the less pleased they are in Japan.”

    “So what’s the problem here?” Kalinske said finally. “Is it jealousy? We have 50 percent of the market and they have less than 15 percent?”

    Whether this mentality was spurred by corporate pride (we don’t need them), creative ownership (we want to do this our way), or competitive skepticism (Sony just wants to see what we’ve got and steal it), Kalinske was not sure, but this certainly wasn’t shaping up to be the no-brainer that he’d been hoping it would be.
    There are a few problems that come up when looking into this more. First, the only information available seems to come from Kalinske himself. There is not a single mention of this in any of the well-documented history of the PlayStation that I could find in English or Japanese that did not begin with Kalinske. I’m not suggesting he’s lying, but just that we only have his account to go on.

    Here is a very brief history of the PlayStation:

    -January 1990: Sony signs an agreement with Nintendo to develop a CD add-on for the SNES as well as a standalone system called the PlayStation.
    -June 1991: Sony unveils the PlayStation. At the same time, Nintendo reveals that it has partnered with Philips behind Sony’s back to develop a separate SNES-CD.
    -Nintendo’s betrayal is due to Sony’s insistence to a licensing arrangement that would have seen Sony benefit heavily from CD-ROM sales.
    -Nintendo makes a more favorable deal with Philips. (This deal soon falls apart but the original contract allows Philips to use Nintendo characters for its CD-i games).
    -Sony is unable to renegotiate with Nintendo. Ken Kutaragi, the creator of the PlayStation, continues development.
    -June 1992: There is heavy opposition from the Sony board to the PlayStation project. As it is about to be cut, Kutaragi reveals that he has an almost fully-functional prototype ready. Sony President Norio Ooga formally approves of the project.

    This is where Kalinske enters the story. According to Console Wars, he approaches Sega of Japan with the proposal sometime at the end of 1992 or the beginning of 1993. He is told that they will consider it.

    Here are the things they probably considered:

    1) Nintendo had just backed out of a deal with Sony because Sony wanted unfavorable licensing terms. Why would things be different with Sega?

    2) Sony was an unknown when it came to game hardware development. There were absolutely no assurances that they knew what they were doing. By that time, the CD-i had been released and had shown what happens when an electronics manufacturer tries to enter the video game industry. Sega, on the other hand, had years and years of experience in hardware development.

    3) Sega had already devoted substantial time and money to developing the Saturn. The Saturn would be all but officially announced in September 1993 by Hitachi in relation to the sales of the SH-2 CPU. That’s only 9 months after Kalinske’s proposal. They likely had a working prototype long before then.

    4) Sony had the hardware and the money to market it. From their viewpoint, all they needed were software developers. Why would Sega suddenly disregard its long history developing game hardware for no apparent reason?

    The only appeal that I can find to this Sony-Sega partnership comes in hindsight: Sony was successful and Sega wasn’t. At the time, I cannot imagine a single good reason for Sega to agree to this.

    I also have to question how much Kalinske really knew about the situation. It’s important to remember he was first and foremost a marketing executive far removed from the R&D labs in Japan at Sega and Sony. He’s made erroneous statements such as:

    Sega-16: That sounds a lot like what happened with the Sony/Nintendo CD-ROM. Sony was willing to enter into a joint hardware platform but was ultimately rejected by Nintendo in favor of Phillips.

    Tom Kalinske: Yeah, but I think ours preceded that though.
    I doubt he was familiar with the details of the Nintendo-Sony debacle at all.

    This seems to be a fairly straight-forward case of hindsight bias by Kalinske.
    Last edited by JumpingRyle; 05-06-2015 at 10:26 AM.

  2. #2
    Antiquing Hedgehog Lord QuickSciFi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Miami, FL
    Age
    37
    Posts
    18,199
    Rep Power
    183

    Default

    I want to see what that version of Sonic looks like... and his girlfriend.

  3. #3
    Outrunner JumpingRyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    737
    Rep Power
    29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by QuickSciFi View Post
    I want to see what that version of Sonic looks like... and his girlfriend.
    Here's the girlfriend:



    I also would really like to see the mythical Goth Sonic!

  4. #4
    Super Robot Raging in the Streets Obviously's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Pennsyltucky
    Posts
    4,158
    Rep Power
    57

    Default

    I've mentioned in the past that we've never seen any evidence of this fanged Sonic. I'm not saying Kalinske didn't see it or that he didn't see something else and mistake it for Sonic but we just don't have any evidence of it and we have a lot of very early Sonic concept art available.

    Sega Mega Drive/Genesis: Collected Works had unprecedented access to Sega's records. Still no fanged Sonic. Honestly though I think he's mis-remembering here and not outright lying, but he's convinced himself of that falsehood and continues to spread it.


    Also I've said in the past that Katz really doesn't get the respect he deserves. He deserves credit for beating back the Turbografx-16 and building up brand recognition that made Kalinske's job easy.

    That said Kalinske deserves some credit as well. He pushed Sonic hard and pushing SOJ to make it a pack-in helped make the Genesis a household name. I just wish he didn't feel the need to exaggerate. I think if Katz had stayed on he likely would have made the same decisions and ultimately sold just as many systems since Kalinske was basically continuing what Katz started with western developed games and a "mature" branding.

  5. #5
    Outrunner JumpingRyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    737
    Rep Power
    29

    Default

    Yeah, I agree that Kalinske deserves praise.

    But that doesn't let him off the hook for trying to claim that he had a part in significantly altering the design of Sonic. By the time he was at Sega, Sonic's design was finished. He is either outright lying or has somehow convinced himself otherwise.

    Of course, there is the very real possibility that Blake Harris misunderstood something and Kalinske didn't really check it over. But that is just as unacceptable in my opinion.

  6. #6
    Master of Shinobi Gentlegamer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    1,200
    Rep Power
    35

    Default

    No one should take Kalinske's claims on anything at face value.

  7. #7
    Outrunner JumpingRyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    737
    Rep Power
    29

    Default

    Tom Kalinske – Man or Myth?

    ROUND THREE


    In Console Wars, after Kalinske personally saves Sonic by redesigning him, he is then called to a meeting with Trip Hawkins of EA. At this meeting, Kalinske negotiates the famous deal with EA after they reverse engineer the Genesis:

    “It’s the price of doing business,” Kalinske said. “Those thousands you spent on making games… what about the millions we spent making consoles? We barely break even on those systems. We’re giving away razors in order to sell the blades.”
    “But they’re my blades.”
    “Yeah, well, they’re our razors!” Kalinske shouted.

    “…here’s what we propose: Sega will grant you permission to make authorized games for the Genesis, and instead of the ten bucks for the cartridges, we’ll only charge you four.”
    “And . . . ?”
    Kalinske looked into his eyes. This really was a shakedown. In addition to the 60 percent cost reduction, Sega would also allow EA to publish up to sixteen games per year and self-manufacture their cartridges.
    Kalinske wanted more, though. He wanted Madden!

    “Actually, there’s something else that we want from you,” Kalinske said. “In exchange for keeping us out of court and saving us both from ever having to have a conversation about razors and razor blades again, I want you to give us Madden.”
    “No way!” Hawkins yelped.
    The development of Joe Montana Football had stalled, and Sega wanted to buy Madden before EA released it and re-label it as Joe Montana Football. In the end, as the story goes, Kalinske and Hawkins make a deal: EA would finish Montana using the Madden engine and get a nice share of the profits, plus they would also release Madden on their own.

    So where does it all fall apart for Mr. Kalinske’s story?

    For starters, the EA deal had already been made by the time Kalinske joined Sega in November 1990. This is a scan from the official Sega magazine, Sega Visions, from October 1990:



    That’s odd. Apparently EA had already become a third party licensee before Kalinske joined Sega. Hmm…

    And, even more, EA had even released several officially licensed games at that point: Populous and Budokan, for example.
    And, even more surprising, EA released John Madden Football on November 4, 1990!

    Of course, the evidence that Kalinske is making this all up doesn’t stop there.

    In this interview, Trip Hawkins says that EA released their first Genesis game in June 1990. Well before Kalinske even knew what a Genesis was.

    In this interview with Michael Knox of Park Place Productions, the developer who EA handed Montana to, Knox says:

    Quote Originally Posted by Michael Knox
    Electronic Arts asked Park Place Productions to do the Joe Montana game for Sega. So we ended up doing the Joe Montana game in eight weeks, before Christmas, by doing it as a derivative of the original John Madden Football
    Eight weeks, before Christmas… hmm…

    The timing of all of this indicates that it was Katz or his staff who made the deal with EA, not Kalinske.

    If you are interested in learning more about the real story behind Joe Montana Football, Melf has an excellent article on it: http://www.sega-16.com/2007/11/behin...tana-football/

    What outrageous stories will I read about Kalinske next?! Stay tuned.

  8. #8
    Super Robot Raging in the Streets Obviously's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Pennsyltucky
    Posts
    4,158
    Rep Power
    57

    Default

    The problem here is your source is The Console Wars which is heavily fictionalized and dramatized since the entire purpose of the book was to try and score a movie deal. Unfortunately for Katz's accomplishments they don't fit with the narrative in this "Kalinske is the business messiah" story. Blake Harris is more to blame than anyone for these stories and the worst part is he's actually responded to some negative Amazon reviews with snark because he doesn't give a shit.

    Too bad most people are going to probably take the book as fact and move on without questioning it. I appreciate the break-down you're giving some of the claims in this "Hollywood-style" telling of Sega's history.
    Last edited by Obviously; 05-03-2015 at 04:40 PM.

  9. #9
    WCPO Agent KillerBean2's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Denmark
    Age
    35
    Posts
    775
    Rep Power
    22

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JumpingRyle View Post
    Here's the girlfriend:



    I also would really like to see the mythical Goth Sonic!
    I'd say his memory was just foggy. That purple gum drop with legs has fangs and so does the pale dude in the background. I bet he was just objecting to the enemy design (and boobs for some reason). After all they DO look very Japanese/spooky/PC Engine-ish.
    Bare Knuckle III rules! Also, the music in this game is freakin awesome.

  10. #10
    Super Robot Raging in the Streets Obviously's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Pennsyltucky
    Posts
    4,158
    Rep Power
    57

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by KillerBean2 View Post
    I'd say his memory was just foggy. That purple gum drop with legs has fangs and so does the pale dude in the background. I bet he was just objecting to the enemy design (and boobs for some reason). After all they DO look very Japanese/spooky/PC Engine-ish.
    I thought the same, that picture is the closest we have to the things Kalinske found objectionable and we did see a major overhaul of the enemies to something more friendly and less bizarre. Not to mention Sonic turned that frown upside down.

  11. #11
    Outrunner JumpingRyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    737
    Rep Power
    29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Obviously View Post
    The problem here is your source is The Console Wars which is heavily fictionalized and dramatized since the entire purpose of the book was to try and score a movie deal. Unfortunately for Katz's accomplishments thay don't fit with the narrative in this "Kalinske is the business messiah" story. Blake Harris is more to blame than anyone for these stories.

    Too bad most people are going to probably take the book as fact and move on without questioning it.
    Blake Harris has repeatedly defended the events portrayed in the book. He has said several times that everything was reviewed by the people who were actually there:

    the people who I wrote dialogue for, in most cases, if not all cases, worked with me and reviewed the writing to make sure it was consistent with how they remembered the tone of the conversation, or remembered the content of the conversation. Or at least that it was something they felt that they did say or would have said, because I feel it's very presumptuous to write dialogue for other people. And I could see how someone could read the book and think that I was sitting on the beach one day, just imagining scenes. I never wanted anything I wrote to appear on Wikipedia that might seem like a fact, but wasn't.
    http://www.usgamer.net/articles/cons...onic-and-mario

    Of course, he could be lying. More likely, Kalinske just didn't bother to review anything or thought it was "close enough". But that doesn't excuse him. Taking credit for things that other people did is pretty damn low. If Kalinske does not agree with how things are portrayed in the book, he has an obligation to speak up.

    Quote Originally Posted by KillerBean2 View Post
    I'd say his memory was just foggy. That purple gum drop with legs has fangs and so does the pale dude in the background. I bet he was just objecting to the enemy design (and boobs for some reason). After all they DO look very Japanese/spooky/PC Engine-ish.
    The book credits him with significantly altering the design of Sonic. Whatever the misunderstanding might be, it needs to be corrected.

  12. #12
    Super Robot Raging in the Streets Obviously's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Pennsyltucky
    Posts
    4,158
    Rep Power
    57

    Default

    For more perspective there's the interview about the book with Kalinske on SEGABits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73abjrBD3NU

    I think much of what happened is Kalinske sat there bullshitting and Harris wrote it all down without fact checking.

  13. #13
    Outrunner JumpingRyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    737
    Rep Power
    29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Obviously View Post
    For more perspective there's the interview about the book with Kalinske on SEGABits: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73abjrBD3NU

    I think much of what happened is Kalinske sat there bullshitting and Harris wrote it all down without fact checking.
    Thanks, I'll listen to that.

    Another thing that bothers me is that Kalinske has been active in promoting this book. He's given interviews about it and appeared on the panel at Comic-Con with Harris. Every indication is that he fully endorses it. So I don't think we can lay all the blame on Harris.

  14. #14
    Super Robot Raging in the Streets Obviously's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Pennsyltucky
    Posts
    4,158
    Rep Power
    57

    Default

    I can blame him for not checking the veracity of his facts in order to instead try to weave a good story. Journalistic integrity involves not taking everything your sources give you at face value.

  15. #15
    Outrunner JumpingRyle's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    737
    Rep Power
    29

    Default

    Yes, and in this case "checking facts" consisted of a 10 minute Google search so really there is no excuse!

    It's even more annoying that he seeks out reviews that question the truth of the book and posts in the comment section defending it:

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/culture/b...sly-false.html

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •