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Thread: Top 10 Genesis Shoot 'em Ups (according to profholt82)

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    The Gaming Gangsta Master of Shinobi profholt82's Avatar
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    Default Top 10 Genesis Shoot 'em Ups (according to profholt82)

    I have been playing through all of my shoot 'em up games on the Genesis over the past couple of months, and finally decided to sit down and come up with my 10 favorites. While I haven't played every shooter on the system as a whole, I have played every NTSC release, so my list will not include the region locked games that aren't available in the US. I don't have any emulator machines or anything, just the physical cartridges, so that's my limitation. I realize that opinions differ, and what is fun to me may not be to someone else, so please take it all with a grain of salt. And with that, here is the first part of my list which includes games 10 through 6. The second part of my list will be coming soon. Thanks for reading.


    10. Bio Hazard Battle

    This may not be the funnest or most technically advanced shooter on the Genesis, but it is one of the most creative. In the aftermath of a great biological war, the planet Avaron is inhabited by a plethora of deadly biological viruses. There are a few humans left, and they are all aboard a space ship which is in orbit of the planet. You are a member of this group and must choose a bioship to go down to the planet, fight these biological forces of evil and find a suitable part of the planet to settle your people. There are 4 ships to choose from and each can be modified by different weapon power ups which are conveniently plopped in your flight path throughout the game. No chasing floating icons around the screen like in the Toaplan games. The gameplay is solid. You have a satellite ship, similar to R-Type, that can be powered to use different types of shots. The movement of your bioship controls the satelliteís orbit, so this adds a strategic element, particularly in the boss battles.

    The graphics get better the deeper you get into the game. At first, the bioship is dropping in from space, and the backgrounds here are rivaled by those of the Atari 2600. But as the game progresses and different geographic regions of the planet are revealed (forests, underwater, bombed out cities, mountain ranges, et cetera), the detailed backgrounds become sights to behold. While the sound does not reach the quality level of the graphics, what is here is unlike anything heard in other Genesis shooters. The music is just solely unique to the game and is often of a spacey quality instead of the normal upbeat rocking tunes that are associated with the genre. The bass and percussion would be right at home in a David Lynch flick, and I think if your Genesis is hooked up to a stereo system youíll appreciate it. But I can see the soundtrack polarizing gamers as it is so unique, but I think it works as it adds to the overall atmosphere of the game.

    Bio Hazard Battle does not reinvent the genre, and there are funner shooters on the system, but the atmosphere created here between the graphical elements and moody soundtrack makes for a unique gaming experience that you canít find elsewhere on the Genesis. Furthermore, everything about the gameplay is fun and solid, and being able to choose different bioships and weapons makes it customizable enough to tailor the game to your playstyle. This all contributes to a great gaming experience.


    9. Gaiares

    Gaiares is one of the most technically impressive shooters on the Genesis. It features exquisitely detailed in-game graphics, both on the sprites and on the parallax scrolling backgrounds. And there are beautiful anime-style cutscenes which are animated and convey the crazy story about a foreign monarch that wants to exploit the radioactive, polluted Earthís resources and destroy the sun. But they offer you a deal, that should you stop them, they will restore the Earth to its original luster. As one of the last surviving members of the human race living on a space station, it is your duty to save the Earth. The synth soundtrack with its pulsating rhythm section will get you pumped to do your job. That said, while this game is as pretty as a diamond, itís also harder than one.

    Aside from just blasting away at enemies with your ship, you control a little satellite ship that can not only shoot as well, but it can also be launched at enemies where it can take control of their weapon and give it to you. This feature adds an entire dimension to the gameplay as there are a myriad of weapon choices available. That said, while this is an excellent hook that gives Gaiares its own singular style and feel among a sea of space shooters on the Genesis, it is also a difficult ability to harness and use correctly. With time and patience, Gaiares can probably become the favorite game of any serious shooter fan, but for me, I just donít have that time and patience. As it is, I find the game to be technically brilliant with an engaging story, beautiful graphics and kickass soundtrack that can be fun in doses. But for me, the difficulty level is such that Iíve never beaten it and canít imagine that I ever will. But I still have a great appreciation for the game, and get enjoyment from playing it when I sit down and put in the effort. And considering the frustration that it's bestowed upon me over the years, the fact that I keep coming back for more speaks to the game's qualities.


    8. Twin Cobra

    Twin Cobra may not be the flashiest game on my list, but it is one of the funnest. While I appreciate the graphical and technical achievements of some of the Genesis shooters, for me, gameplay trumps all, and Twin Cobra has that in spades. This is a port of an early Toaplan arcade game, and it translates perfectly to the Genesis. You control a helicopter and attempt to traverse 10 levels over sea and air in which a faceless enemy military goes to incredible lengths to stop you with cannons, tanks, planes, choppers, and some stuff that I donít think even has a name. The further into the game you get, the more brutal the challenge becomes with enemies that swarm you from every direction.

    Similar to the other Toaplan shooters, you can power up your helicopter and there are 4 types of shots available by picking up the color-coded icons (red - straight fire, blue Ė spread shot, yellow Ė 4 way, green Ė laser beam). Iím most partial to the blue spread shot, but each of them offers something that can be helpful at different stages of the game. Twin Cobra has rather average graphics, thereís nothing remarkable here, but it does the job. Your helicopter and the enemy sprites are well-detailed for the most part while the backgrounds are plain and uninspired. The sound is pretty dang good with a rocking soundtrack that keeps you pumped up throughout the game. The songs eventually begin to repeat themselves by the later levels, however, so I wish they had added a few more.

    What I really like about Twin Cobra is that, unlike many Genesis shooters, the action fills the entire screen. Too often in these games we see that an entire portion of the screen has a black strip filled with statistical information. This is usually due to games being originally designed for arcade screens which have a different aspect ratio than the Genesis, but it is annoying nonetheless, and that is not an issue here. In fact, as you control your helicopter from side to side, even more of the playfield reveals itself. And this can be used to your strategic advantage at certain points in the game.

    What sets Twin Cobra apart from many of its contemporaries is that, in spite of its often brutal difficulty, the fun factor is so high that I keep coming back for more. And that is the single biggest reason why it is one of the best shooters on the Genesis.


    7. Elemental Master

    Elemental Master takes place in the kingdom of Lorelei which is in a fantasy Middle-Earth universe. This is a setting not unfamiliar to RPGs and adventure games, but wholly unique to shooters. As Laden, a long-haired caped crusader with magical sorcery at his disposal, you must defeat the evil Gyra to restore the kingdom to its original tranquil state of being. Along the way, Laden gets to battle all sorts of mythical creatures who have been unleashed upon the kingdom by the evil Gyra and take on some truly epic bosses, some of which transform into massive grotesques. With the occasional animated cutscenes between levels which provide the story progression, EM is one heck of an adventure.

    Graphically, this game is a sight to behold with so many creative enemies and backgrounds. You fight in dark swamps and forests as well as castles and dungeons, and each setting is well thought out in its design. Our heroís flowing brown mane and shimmering red cape make for one of the most unique shooter vehicles of any of the games in the genre I can think of. And the music has that thumping Technosoft rhythm that powers you through the game, but it still has that element of fantasy epic that fits the setting of the story; and it can be effective at times, particularly during dramatic cut scenes.

    Laden has the ability to shoot his magical sorcery both ahead and backwards which is necessary to traverse the levels as the enemies come at you from every which way. Being able to switch magic on the fly is great and adds a strategic element to the proceedings as different techniques are more effective for certain enemies and situations which often change within a level. Furthermore, each technique can be powered up for a super shot which makes taking down some of the bosses much easier. And while all of this requires you to think on your feet, it can be mastered with practice. That is perhaps what I like best about this game, the way it makes you think your way through it. This isnít a mindless shooter where you just fire away at everything willy-nilly, you have to devise a strategy to succeed in Elemental Master.


    6. Fire Shark

    In Fire Shark you control a little red World War I era biplane and take on waves of enemies that are decidedly not from the WWI era. More like Cold War era tanks, cannons, jets and battle ships among other far more technologically advanced war machines. But that lack of logic does not matter in the least because Fire Shark is as fun as shooters get. And donít worry, the weapon power ups to your little plane turn it into something out of a science fiction movie anyway.

    Similar to the graphics in the aforementioned Toaplan game Twin Cobra, the main plane and the enemy sprites are drawn well enough, and ooze that early Genesis charm, but the static backgrounds leave much to be desired. They're generally desert or water, and often appear rather plain Jane with no movement and little detail. At the conclusion of each level, your plane will briefly land at a base where tiny little green soldiers can be seen running around and sometimes form into a formation which is a cool sight. And these sequences occasionally throw in some humor, such as when a soldier boards a plane and takes off next to your plane as if he is going to be your wing man, but then promptly crashes before the level begins. If you look closely, you'll see the poor little fella lying in the smoldering wreckage twitching. It's sick, but hilarious, and I love these little details which occasionally pop up in the game. And Fire Shark features great music, but sadly, thereís just not enough of it. The songs begin repeating themselves in later levels which was also an issue in Twin Cobra. However, the music that is here is rocking, and keeps you alert during some of the gameís difficult sequences.

    The gameplay is as good as it gets in the shooter genre on the Genesis. Your biplane has 3 types of shots available throughout the game, green, teal and red. Green is a powerful laser that goes from straight ahead to sort of a lateral pattern as it is upgraded. Teal is the least powerful of the bunch, but it spreads outward across the screen which can be very effective at times. Red is a flame thrower, and when fully powered it can nearly cover the entire screen in a crazy pattern unlike anything Iíve seen in other games. The power ups are little colored squares which float around and bounce off the sides of the screen. If my teal or red weapon is powered up and the green square (or sometimes squares; yes, plural) is bouncing around, I do my damndest to dodge it like an enemy, but I donít know, some gamers may prefer the green laser, I just happen to think it sucks.

    Fire Shark does suffer from a lack of true end bosses. While some levels feature a large powerful ship or plane that must be defeated to end of the level, others have nothing to offer and the level just ends uneventfully. Okay, technically there may be a series of planes in a row that are a little more difficult than a normal enemy, but nothing like a true end boss. Some of the levels are on the short side as well. As in you blink and they're done, so when there's no true end boss, this is cause for disappointment. However, there is little to no slowdown to speak of throughout the game, even during an end boss battle or when an abundance of enemies fill the screen. This is impressive considering it is an early Genesis title.

    The game's flaws notwithstanding, it is quite fun and addictive. The plane handles smoothly with the ability to upgrade its speed throughout, and the shooting just feels so effortless and natural. While the later stages can test your patience when enemies appear fast and furiously, I always feel in control, and that if I am shot down, it is of my own doing. Speaking of which, when you're shot down, the game gives you a couple of seconds to get off a shot or two before you crash to your demise, so you get the chance to exact a little revenge which is a great touch. So while Fire Shark is not perfect by any stretch, the amazing gameplay more than makes up for its deficiencies.

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    The Gaming Gangsta Master of Shinobi profholt82's Avatar
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    5. Lightening Force (Thunder Force IV)

    The most beautiful looking shooter on the Genesis and one of the most beautiful looking games on the entire system, Lightening Force is a graphical juggernaut. This game pushes the Genesis to the limit, thereís no other way to put it. The finest examples of parallax scrolling, and there are some effects that Iíve only ever seen duplicated on later CD-based games. However, for all of the incredible graphical effects that make my eyes weep, there is a hefty price to payÖÖSLOW DOWN! Holy spit is there a ton of slow down in this game. Itís not Super R-Type bad, but it sho ainít good. With that elephant out in the open, the game is still Thunder Force, and is therefore, still a blast to play.

    In comparison to the prior game in the series, this one definitely ups the ante in the difficulty department, particularly with the boss battles. And while you can switch between weapons on the fly in this game just as in the prior, here there just seems to be a bit more strategy involved in your decisions. Not that that wasnít also the case in TFIII, but in this game, choosing the right weapon for each situation seems to be more important and comes up more often than in the predecessor. Thereís no doubt that this is the most polished game in the Genesis TF series.

    Anyway, I get that many a gamer fawns over this one, and rightfully so, it is a great game with incredibly impressive visuals and an excellent kickass Technosoft soundtrack that is memorable and highly appropriate for the proceedings, particularly the deeper into the game you get; however, while the gameplay has some slight tweaks from the previous game, it is not anything that we havenít seen in the series before, as it basically plays the same as TFIII. Now, that is not a bad thing, as TFIII is one of the best shooters on the system, but the massive amount of slow down in Lightening Force just makes it less fun to play overall, so I donít like it quite as much. Obviously, with all of that said, Lightening Force still broke into my top 5, so I still enjoy playing the heck out of it, but itís just not the pinnacle of Genesis shooters to me that it is for many gamers.


    4. Granada

    Have you ever wanted to man a super powered tank and eff some stuff up? If so, then Granada is the game for you. As Leon, you get to drive Granada, ďa maneuver cepter from which unit or country of origin is unknown. This weapon has been destroying all kinds of weapons one after the other regardless of attached camps, north or south. Somebody calls it ďgod of the African continent,Ē another calls it ďghost of the soldiers.Ē Only those who actually happen to see it know the truth.Ē Yeah, yeah, yeah, Wolf Team, we get it. Itís a badass tank that blows stuff up. Hahahaha.

    What makes Granada different than the other Genesis shooters is not only the fact that your vehicle is a tank instead of a plane or ship, but that each level of the game has a set of objectives that you must complete before getting to face the stage end boss. This brings in the ability to strategize your way through the levels as you have to choose which targets to take out in which order. The stages are laid out in a maze pattern, and there are traps along the way which can hamper your tank. The tank can shoot and move in any direction, plus it has the ability to strafe while holding a button which is absolutely imperative during certain boss battles. There are different weapons which can be picked up for your tank as well as little satellite buddies which help your tank out by giving a little added protection and extra fire power. These little fellas are hidden throughout the levels which adds more incentive to search the levels a bit instead of just making a beeline for the targets. And finally, regarding your shots, you can hold the button to power up your shot to make it do extra damage. This is a big help during boss fights, just be sure to hold your strafe to dodge attacks while that baby is warming up.

    Graphically, the game is nothing to get all that excited about. While the level layouts are clever and fun to negotiate, the colors and textures are rather bland. Also, your tank and most of the enemies are small and donít exactly have all that much detail. The bosses, on the other hand, are huge, creative and often colorful. They really stand out compared to the rest of the design choices in the game. The music is average to perhaps slightly above average for the shooter genre. Itís upbeat and appropriate for the goings on, but I wouldnít load it up on a mixtape or anything. Serviceable is probably the best word to describe it.

    Phew, now with all of that out of the way, is Granada fun? Hells yes, it is! Maneuvering that little tank throughout the stage mazes is fun as all get out, and the designs of the levels have obviously had plenty of thought put into them. There are 9 levels total and some of the end bosses are really cool looking. One of the end bosses hangs out in a box with walls that deflect your shot. To best describe what I mean, this simulates a pool table. So, you must judge the angles of your shots to bounce of the walls the right way to hit the boss. I loved this boss fight and wish there were more like it in the game. Regardless, itís all fun, and while a bit unorthodox in comparison to the multitude of other Genesis shooters, Granada stands out as one of the best.


    3. Thunder Force III

    When I first picked up Thunder Force III on my Genesis back in the day, I wasnít yet familiar with the series. I hadnít yet played TFII or Lightening Force, and didnít know exactly what to expect beyond the screenshots and what was written on the back of the box. I just knew that I liked shooters and I thought that it looked like a cool game. Well, I chose wisely that day because TFIII is a top-notch shooter that does everything right. Right off the bat, the game is jam packed with character as you get to choose from 5 different planets, each well-defined with its own individual feel. Itís clear that a lot of thought went into creating this universe. And when youíre starting up a new game, itís refreshing to able to do it your own way by choosing which order to play through it. This was a rather novel concept for shooters of the era.

    Now, being able to hold an arsenal of five shot types, and only losing the one that is in use when your ship is shot down and keeping the rest in your arsenal is rather forgiving for a shooter. And with the ability to power up these shots and protect your ship with a shield, once youíve put some time into the game, and memorized some of the more random moments that can sneak up on you, TFIII is definitely one of the easier games in the shoot Ďem up genre. But in order to get to the point where you can breeze through much of the game, you have to put in the time. On the flipside, itís more forgiving nature makes it much more attractive to new players who may not be experts in the genre. Anyway, that is a small quibble I have with the game, it is a bit on the easy side compared to most of my favorite shooters. But it is still so much fun to pick up and replay frequently, and being able to start the game on any of the 5 initial planets is a big part of that.

    For me, TFIII is Technosoftís masterpiece. While it is not the graphical stunner that its sequel is, the visuals are still jaw dropping at times; particularly that famous wavy fire background on the Planet Gorgon. But each of the levels have their own charm with tons of detail and lots of visual treats like layered backgrounds and parallax scrolling. TFIII goes to great lengths to create its own immersive universe. And while the soundtrack may not be the all time classic of its sequel, it is still fantastic. Each stage has music that has clearly been thought out and inspired by the levelís theme, and the boss fights all feature a more dramatic and uptempo theme that helps you to get into the proper mindset and step your game up for the bigger challenge. But most importantly, TFIII has it where it counts, gameplay; all the TF goodness without all of that pesky slow down. The best horizontal scrolling shoot Ďem up on the Genesis, mark it.



    2. Truxton

    Truxton is pure shoot Ďem up nirvana. No gimmicks, just balls out shooter action that packs a ton of fun into a measly 2 mega power package. This was a very early release, so youíd think it would be a plain Jane fugly frau, but they added so much character and personality to this game, and even after all these years (I had this game in the early 90s, I think it was my first shmup), itís still a blast to play. Unlike the other 2 Toaplan games on my list (Fire Shark and Twin Cobra), the backgrounds of Truxton have texture and colors and actually create a universe which makes the game that much more immersive. The ship and enemy sprites are even more detailed. That said, Truxton doesnít have the graphics or technical virtuosity of many of its more heralded genre brethren, but it has it where it counts, fun addictive gameplay. Now I realize that this game has its share of haters, but what can I say? To quote Sly and the Family Stone, ďdifferent strokes for different folks, so on and so on and scooby dooby doo.Ē

    All right, so Truxton isnít a technical marvel, but it is action packed and loads of fun. And with adjustable difficulty, as well as getting progressively tougher each time it is looped, the game packs a solid challenge. There are only 5 levels, but they are split up into 2 sections each, so a single playthrough without looping still runs about the average amount of time as most Genesis shooters. And the end battles feature some massive bosses that are plenty of fun to defeat. The 3 main shot types are red spread fire, green laser blast and a blue homing electro beam. Each of these weapons can be powered up numerous times until they can handle just about anything the game throws at you. And you can always clear the screen at will with the colossal signature skull bomb. There are also speed power ups, and while I like to grab a few here and there because your default speed is rather slow, I find that fully powering up the speed can get a bit too ridiculous for me, to the point that you barely touch the d-pad and your ship is zipping across the screen. Some may dig that, but itís too much for me; hence, my preference for half speed or so. Going back to the Thunder Force games, I like that they let you adjust your speed level on the fly, I wish more games had that feature. Finally, the music in Truxton is some of the most memorable on the system for me. Itís so fast and intense, and it really gets me pumped up for blasting away at some alien bastards.

    I realize that Truxton isnít a favorite of many gamers, but heck, most of my list probably isnít and I love this game. Even after playing it for over 20 years, I still pop it into my Genesis and loop it at least a few times a year. And I canít even say that for every game on this list, let alone some other more heralded games out there.




    Drum roll pleaseÖ..
    And now for the one youíve all been waiting for, the best shoot Ďem up on the Sega Genesis is

    GADGET TWINS!

    This cute Ďem up is a technical wonder with incredible gameplay that runs at a high-octane pace. ItísÖÖ Hahahaha, just joking. I think some of you have already guessed the real number one.



    1. MUSHA

    Right from the opening animated cutscenes which set up the story, I was hooked. ďHow can you expect the five of us to attack this massive enemy armada?Ē ďShut up Greg, all you ever do is complain!Ē Hahahaha, yes! It doesnít matter anyway, Greg, because youíll be shot down before the actual gameplay even begins. Compile's MUSHA encapsulates all of my favorite things about the shoot Ďem up genre into one glorious little cartridge. Engaging story with anime-style cut scenes, the most amazing Sega Genesis music that has ever been recorded, beautifully detailed character and enemy sprites, backgrounds which utilize the Genesis hardware with layers, transparencies and parallax scrolling as well as some stuff that people donít even realize is possible on the hardware (when the floor tiles fall and enemies are shot down into the lava pit in the second or third level, itís a similar effect to the SNES mode 7). But on top of all of this technical prowess, MUSHAís gameplay is amazing and second to none in the genre.

    The fact is that MUSHA appears to be somewhat more complex than the average shooter on its surface, but in actuality it is quite simple, and a great example of ďeasy to pick up and play, but difficult to master.Ē There are only 3 types of weapon shots available, but they can be powered up numerous times, and when your ship is hit, you lose a power level. Your life isnít lost unless you are on the lowest power level. So, while MUSHA has a reputation for its difficulty, it is actually rather forgiving compared to most shoot Ďem ups, and once you put some time into it and understand the ins and outs, youíll be able to beat it in no time. From collecting little cylinders that you can shoot out of a helper ship (similar to the gnomes with the magic bags in Golden Axe) your ship also gets some aid from 2 little robotic satellite ships that are called arms. These fellas can be adjusted to shoot in different directions by pressing the A button. Granted, they arenít all that powerful, but in some sections of the game, their help is greatly appreciated, particularly considering the fast pace that MUSHA runs at. It definitely seems quicker than a lot of shoot Ďem ups, and blasting my way through it (with that killer soundtrack cranked up on my stereo) can be a real rush.

    In addition to the excellent gameplay, music and graphical effects, what makes MUSHA really special is the overall universe that it creates. It all takes place in an alternate history in which feudal Japanese architecture and culturalisms exist side by side with advanced futuristic robotics. It makes for a very cool setting, and some of the bosses have to be seen to be believed. MUSHA just has so much character and personality. I realize that over the years, it has built a reputation among collectors and now commands a hefty price tag. I was fortunate to pick up a copy many years ago before it started going for crazy prices. But if there was ever a game that flash carts like the Everdrive were created for, this is the one. My all time favorite shoot Ďem up, and one of my favorite video games of all time, MUSHA!
    Last edited by profholt82; 07-09-2019 at 07:40 PM.

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    VA1LT CHIP ENABLED Master of Shinobi OverDrone's Avatar
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    Great analysis section on each game! I'm of the same opinion regarding much of what you wrote.

    Good to see Twin Cobra make it into your top 10. It's certainly extraordinarily brutal as a result of the ratio change. I've got the JP Kuyukyoku Tiger and I'm not sure if they fiddled with the difficulty between regions, but the game is granite hard on defaults. I'm pretty sure I haven't cleared stage 2 without dialling the difficulty down in the menu, which must be some sort of record for me. Apart from the screen format change, the port also delivers a punchy new version of the soundtrack which is appreciated. On the other hand it's a pity the graphics use the MD low res mode, as a result it lacks the sharp appraisal of the in-house Toaplan ports.

    Still, great vertical shooter for the console.

    Fire Shark is a given, best vert on the MD overall IMO. Same power up system as Truxton, but fairer level design and a finer granularity to the speed ups (a couple other Toaplan shooters feel like they miss the spot here and become too twitchy after only a couple of pick-ups, Truxton and Zero Wing for example).

    Agree completely with your assessment of Bio Hazard Battle. The background graphics truly get better as the game progresses, likewise the soundtrack becomes increasingly alien, perfectly matching the sub-life theme (one of my favourites, and obviously not commonly represented in video games). Definitely feels like it fills a gap in the MD shmup library left by the absence of any R-Type release.

    Speaking of my own top 10, I'd probably be inclined to include Slap Fight MD somewhere near the top on account of the special mode alone.

    Interested to see what games top your list. I'm guessing TFIV has to be in there somewhere!
    Last edited by OverDrone; 07-07-2019 at 01:47 AM.

  4. #4
    Master of Shinobi
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    Undead Line ? please

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    The Gaming Gangsta Master of Shinobi profholt82's Avatar
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    The site was running a bit sluggish for me tonight, but I managed to get 3 more finished up this evening, and have updated the list. My top 2 games will be coming soon, so stay tuned. You'll be able to tell me what an idiot I am in no time.

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    Master of Shinobi
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    Most of us are already able to call you an idiot for not having TFIV as your No1 pick. Also I can think of more than two games that are better than at least half your list. I suspect Twinkle Tale is not going to make it.

    Seriously, as others have pointed, the interesting thing is your analysis, not the list itself. I would have put everything at once and in the OP, though. Great job anyway!
    Lists of MD games: officially licensed (~925) @ cartridge size milestones @ Top 5 @ Top 250 (controversial) @ Sonic hacks @ best title screens @ Arcade ports (150)

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    counter of beans Hedgehog-in-TrainingWildside Expert Cafeman's Avatar
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    I never tire of reading about Genesis shooters. Waiting to see if your #1 Is same as mine ... starts with "M" !

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    Hedgehog-in-Training Hedgehog-in-TrainingWildside Expert MushaAleste's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cafeman View Post
    ... starts with "M" !
    Minesweeper? Mummies ate my breakfast? Metal Toads?

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    Master of Shinobi Alianger's Avatar
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    With Granada in there, it could be Desert Strike!
    On a wave of mutilation

    https://minirevver.weebly.com/

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    counter of beans Hedgehog-in-TrainingWildside Expert Cafeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MushaAleste View Post
    Minesweeper? Mummies ate my breakfast? Metal Toads?

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    Genesis Knight's Avatar
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    Hard to take this list seriously with TFIV behind Granada.

  12. #12
    The Gaming Gangsta Master of Shinobi profholt82's Avatar
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    I mentioned this in the OP, but some of you may have missed it; I played through all of the North American released shoot 'em ups on the Genesis. I realize there are many highly regarded shooters that weren't released here, but sadly, I have not played them. I would like to branch out into Japan region games in the future though.

    As for any other criticisms, what can I tell you? There's no accounting for taste. While I appreciate the brilliance of a game like TFIV, damned if I didn't have a lot more fun playing Granada. We all like what we like. Anyway, sorry it took a few days to finish up. When I decided to do a write up about my favorite shmups on the system, I figured it'd be a fun way to spend an hour or so, but somehow it ballooned into a 5000 word dissertation. Hahahaha. It was a labor of love though. Thanks for reading, guys.

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    Hedgehog-in-Training Hedgehog-in-TrainingWildside Expert MushaAleste's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by profholt82 View Post
    Thanks for reading, guys.
    With just 4 megs MUSHA is one of the most efficient and highly polished games ever created. It's musical score is simply one of the most amazing compositions of all time. Anyway, thanks for writing this dude. It was a fun read!

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    Outrunner Vludi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Genesis Knight View Post
    Hard to take this list seriously with Granada behind Musha.
    ftfy, Granada is great.
    Fine list, prefer TF4 over 3 and maybe Fire shark over Truxton but nice.

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    Hedgehog-in-Training Hedgehog-in-TrainingRoad Rasher
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    Did you consider Sub-Terrania to be a shoot 'em up for the purposes of this list? That's a game I revisited recently, and I actually enjoyed it a lot (well, until I got destroyed on stage seven). I can definitely see my self spending some more time with it in the near future.

    Granada is one I've been meaning to revisit for quite some time. I played it a bit after I acquired it and remembered liking it, but I haven't spent nearly enough time with it.

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