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KitsuneNight
04-30-2013, 02:09 PM
are there any games incompatible with the cdx\multi mega
or wil they all work as they should ?

Thierry Henry
04-30-2013, 02:28 PM
AFAIK, they should all work.
I usually hear of The Terminator, Radical Rex, and Who Shot Johnny Rock? as having issues on a CDX. I own those games and they play perfectly fine.

Drakon
04-30-2013, 02:34 PM
are there any games incompatible with the cdx\multi mega
or wil they all work as they should ?

Good thread, I'm wondering about the x'eye as well

mrbigreddog
04-30-2013, 02:39 PM
Only one I had problems with is Prince of Persia... Terminator worked fine for me..

Assman
04-30-2013, 06:58 PM
I haven't had problems with any games, cart or disc, on the CDX or X'Eye.

Actually, I take that back. Turrican won't play on an X'Eye; I don't remember if it plays on a CDX, but I'd assume not. Any early unlicensed titles like that are going to have a problem, but that goes for any other console with TMSS too.

Sean697
04-30-2013, 11:18 PM
Yes my John Madden and Budokan do not work. TMSS for sure.

KitsuneNight
05-01-2013, 12:02 AM
it would kinda help if people mention if the game is cardridge or cd btw ;)
especially in some cases like terminator

Assman
05-01-2013, 03:56 PM
I'm pretty sure Thierry Henry and mrbigreddog are talking about CD games. Who cares about the shitty cart version of Terminator anyway? I've only heard of disc-based games ever having compatibility problems on the CDX, and those claims are never consistent enough to be dependable. I've also heard of people having trouble with Jurassic Park, but others haven't, and I personally had no problems booting a burned copy of it.

Any TMSS-related issue is only going to affect cart games. Those are mostly EA titles.

Basically, 99% of cart and original CD games are gonna run on a CDX, including Master System games. I don't even think it's worth worrying about, to be honest.

lumclaw
05-01-2013, 04:33 PM
I'd focus on laser wear. CDX is too valuable to overly subject to scratched, scuffed, and improper burned games

KitsuneNight
05-01-2013, 05:06 PM
laser wear ?
seriously sucha thing excists ?

nieds16
05-01-2013, 08:04 PM
I don't know if the laser wear thing is true or not, but for me there is no reason to take a chance with a CDX. I've read a lot about it and the burn speeds blah blah blah blah blah blah blah. In the end, nobody agrees and I've never seen proof 1 way or another. If somebody want to go buy 2 new lasers, set up a disc based game and run it until it burns out I might just believe it. Until then, who knows.

Mask of Destiny
05-01-2013, 08:23 PM
I don't think laser diodes actually wear out (gas lasers do though). The mechanical bits certainly wear out over time though and if the unit is having a hard time reading the disc that would presumably mean some more work for those bits. Even perfect discs will still induce wear in those components though.

KitsuneNight
05-02-2013, 12:00 AM
that is normal though
and i am aware of the horror stories of early ps 1 models that wore out the soft plastic laser array's

kool kitty89
05-03-2013, 02:36 AM
Burned discs can be BETTER than commercial pressed discs too though. :p
It's just a matter of having a good quality CD-R and a constant write speed. (slow/fast doesn't matter so much as being fixed, non-variable -ie not "auto" or "fast" or "optimum" ) 16x is close to the fastest speed you can get in that context (I think 20x may as well, depending on the drive, but 16x is plenty fast and pretty consistent from what I've read/experienced).

Most good quality old commercial pressed discs in decent condition will be as good or better than those CD-Rs, of course, but ones in less stellar condition (scratches or disc "rot") or those with actual manufacturing faults (including problems in the reflective layer or general plastic issues leading to heavier "rot") are cases where decent quality CD-Rs become preferable.
Then there's just mass produced (pressed) CDs just of questionable quality in general . . . like what happened with the first edition Pier Solar release's CDs. (works fine in typical PC drives, but very unreliable in the MCD for the actual in-game content -the proprietary 32 kHz PCM soundtrack format- though the redbook stuff plays fine on my SCD -ripping the disc and burning a backup at 16x on my laptop worked perfectly for my Model 1 Sega CD) ;)


Keeping the CD drive mechanism itself clean and well lubricated is important to performance, reliability, and longevity of the drive too. (cleaning and lubricating properly too . . . certainly cleaners -anything with ammonia for one- and lubricants are big no-nos -typical silicone lubricant is fine iirc, but I recall some petroleum based oils being bad for plastics)
You should especially do this if you notice significant grinding sounds or such and/or significant read errors and re-seeking of the drive. (the model 1 Sega CD has more moving parts to consider too)
Silicone oil tends to work great for smoothing out the Dreamcast's noisy drive too.

Chilly Willy
05-03-2013, 03:13 PM
I don't think laser diodes actually wear out (gas lasers do though). The mechanical bits certainly wear out over time though and if the unit is having a hard time reading the disc that would presumably mean some more work for those bits. Even perfect discs will still induce wear in those components though.

The difference is that commercial discs usually use aluminum as a reflective layer, and it's VERY reflective. CDRs have a recordable surface layer which is not as reflective as aluminum, so on some consoles, you have to increase the power to the laser diode to get a strong enough signal to read the CDR reliably. That increase in power CAN wear out the laser diode faster... how much faster depends on how much you have to increase the power. It's a BIG issue on GameCubes since the laser has to be adjusted quite a bit higher to read mini DVD-Rs.

By the way, PSX discs were black because they left out the aluminum layer, counting on the plastic base to be reflective enough in the infrared that you could still read the disc. Later PS2 discs used blue coloring to help tell CDs from DVDs, but it is the same thing - counting on the blue plastic being reflective in the infrared. Theoretically, CDRs/DVD-Rs should be BETTER for PSX/PS2 than the commercial discs!

TmEE
05-04-2013, 01:19 AM
Stuff like CDX have fixed laser intensity that can only be manually adjusted.

On machines with realtime calibration like PS1 and Dreamcast you can kill the laser by using dirty and scratched discs, they just increase power output until they get a reading... heightened levels over a longer period of time result in premature death of the laser.

kool kitty89
05-04-2013, 01:36 AM
There's the separate issue of wear on the drive mechanism itself from hard to read discs forcing frequent seeking to try reading a bad part of the disc. That's harder on some drives than others.

Vector2013
05-04-2013, 11:40 AM
On machines with realtime calibration Dreamcast you can kill the laser by using dirty and scratched discs, they just increase power output until they get a reading... heightened levels over a longer period of time result in premature death of the laser.

Did it ever happen to you ?

spiffyone
05-05-2013, 08:57 PM
Correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't something like the Game Genie circumvent the TMSS lock-out for those older unlicensed titles?