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Blades
12-16-2017, 06:53 PM
How long was the Sega Saturn relevant from a technical standpoint?

It seems like in mid-1997 developers just stopped caring, with the half-assed ports of Doom and Croc reaching store shelves. Even Sonic Jam has excessive slowdown. I imagine this is because the hardware had become too convoluted to spend time figuring out. Sega was developing the Dreamcast at this point anyway.

It also appears that the Saturn was competitive at launch in late 1994 (in Japan) and late 1995 (in US).

When exactly did the Saturn stop being relevant in the US? In Japan?

Sure, there were great games released exclusively in Japan for years after 1997, but few of them taxed the Saturn with a few notable exceptions (Radiant Silvergun).

I think the Playstation was only relevant for the first two years of it's existence, after which it was acceptable but not the best anymore.

Thief
12-16-2017, 07:09 PM
Was relevant enough until that dumb Saturn is not our future line. After that seems like everyone was rushing out what they had in the pipeline or flat out canceling.

Blades
12-16-2017, 07:14 PM
^True, mid-1997 was when cancellations started en masse.

But even then, titles like Resident Evil took an entire year to come out on the Saturn (1997).

Barone
12-16-2017, 08:10 PM
How long was the Sega Saturn relevant from a technical standpoint?

It seems like in mid-1997 developers just stopped caring, with the half-assed ports of Doom and Croc reaching store shelves. Even Sonic Jam has excessive slowdown. I imagine this is because the hardware had become too convoluted to spend time figuring out. Sega was developing the Dreamcast at this point anyway.

It also appears that the Saturn was competitive at launch in late 1994 (in Japan) and late 1995 (in US).

When exactly did the Saturn stop being relevant in the US? In Japan?

Sure, there were great games released exclusively in Japan for years after 1997, but few of them taxed the Saturn with a few notable exceptions (Radiant Silvergun).

I think the Playstation was only relevant for the first two years of it's existence, after which it was acceptable but not the best anymore.
I sense you have two different questions here: one related to its commercial status and another related to its technical relevance.

The commercial part doesn't appeal to me so I'll focus on the technical thing:

1) It was never as relevant for 3rd parties (and the game developers community in general) as the Mega Drive/Genesis was, for an example. You have several interviews in this site and from other sources stating that developers were eager and curious to work on the Mega Drive, to migrate from computer hardware to its architecture, to migrate from NES to a powerful 16-bit platform.
You don't see the same quotes related to the Saturn. The context was completely different (Saturn had to go head to head with the PS1 from start, had inferior 3D architecture, etc.).

2) I'd say the Saturn was technically a respectable force up until around the Virtua Fighter 2 release. After that, I don't think it was really all that influential.
By late 1996 the PS1 3D games were already blowing the Saturn out of the water with impressive use of particles and transparencies such as in Wipeout 2097.

3) Regarding the PS1, it had one feature that made A LOT of difference: additive alpha blending. And multi-texturing with decent performance was also possible.
I'd say those two features carried it on for quite some time.
In terms of sound effects capabilities it was also pretty strong.

Moto Racer (1997) was a game used to benchmark the different 3D Accelerator Video Cards at the time and the PS1 version rivals with the best PC configurations aside from geometry and resolution.
It also had better sound effects than the PC version; and better smoke and skid mark effects as well.

The first Gran Turismo game was also very strong. Resolution, geometry and lighting effects were bad compared to top-tier PC racing games and some N64 titles; but the multi-texturing glossy look of the cars pretty much started a trend that would come in full force during the next year.
The then realistic engine noise was also a strong point of the game.

By 1998 I'd say the PS1 had already become noticeably inferior to most of the top-tier PC offerings, which is always a sign of decadence.
PC games of 1998 included Unreal, BreakNeck (Nice 2), Motorhead, etc. Those games were, graphically, *leagues* ahead of the PS1 games just by looking at them for some minutes. If you look past resolution and nasty texture filtering, Top Gear Overdrive (1998) on the N64 was graphically on par with the prettiest PC racing games of that year.

Blades
12-16-2017, 08:26 PM
^Great post.

My reason for asking is to get some understanding of why the Saturn was designed as it was, so different from everything else. I've heard here and there that 1) The Saturn was designed as a 2D machine first, 2) that it was based on the parallel processing designs of the Model 1 and 2 boards (which is why it shares quads with them). Was there any reason for R & D to make the Saturn as convoluted as it is? Are there any primary sources?

It makes no sense, unless they expected some sort of gain from the complex architecture especially after the Genesis which was relatively simple.

Blades
12-16-2017, 08:29 PM
After that, Sega set out to develop a new 32-bit console. We were then in the process of researching what kind of games we could create using CG technology. Driving games, flight simulators, but what else…? Yu Suzuki (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yu_Suzuki) was working on an experimental project to render and animate humans in 3D CG. Eventually he showed us what he had been working on, and we all saw something we had previously thought impossible: realistic human figures rendered in CG. Once we saw that, we were no longer worried about the kinds of games we’d be able to make with this new technology.

-Hideki Sato, head of Sega R & D, confirming that the Saturn was designed for 3D from the beginning.

From here. (http://shmuplations.com/segahistory/)

saturndual32
12-17-2017, 12:28 AM
It seems like in mid-1997 developers just stopped caring, with the half-assed ports of Doom and Croc reaching store shelves. Even Sonic Jam has excessive slowdown. I imagine this is because the hardware had become too convoluted to spend time figuring out. Sega was developing the Dreamcast at this point anyway.


I dont think Saturn Croc was a port. I think it was actually the leading platform, IIRC. Also, compared with most stuff on the system, Saturn Croc is pretty impressive. Problem is, people like comparing it with the Playstation version.
About Doom, it wasnt a half assed port either. The coders actually wanted to take full advantage of the system and bring to Saturn a great conversion of Doom. They just weren allowed to code it in a way that would take full advantage of the system, by Carmack himself!. But the guys did make an effort.

gamevet
12-17-2017, 01:31 AM
EA had the Saturn as its lead platform in the West up until the end of 1996. Soviet Strike and The Need for Speed on the Saturn were the best versions of those games on console.

The FMV quality of the Saturn was on-par with the PlayStation for Soviet Strike. The Saturn version had deeper colors, slightly better textures and better use of lighting effects during the explosions. The PlayStation version had plain white lighting on the ground surrounding the exploding object, while the Saturn version had a golden color to those explosions, along with a much larger spread. The PlayStation version did have a nice transparent shadow under the helicopter though, compared to the black shadow on the Saturn.

cBktXhC1z2g



The Saturn version of The Need for Speed was the best version of the game on consoles. It had slightly better textures than the 3DO and PlayStation versions, along with a much smoother frame-rate. It also had superior load times, compared to the PlayStation. I'll give a nod to the PlayStation version for having some cool lighting effects during the tunnel sequences, that were not present in the Saturn version.

RvwreqnAFDM


There was a PC graphics card based around the Saturn's 3D design. It was one of the 1st GPUs released by Nvidia for the PC.
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Team Andromeda
12-17-2017, 06:52 AM
EA had the Saturn as its lead platform in the West up until the end of 1996. Soviet Strike and The Need for Speed on the Saturn were the best versions of those games on consolw

EA did not lead at all on the Saturn. The Fifa port after the PS version and wasn't done in-house but handed out to Prope, Soviet Strike also came latter and was again handed out to the then 3rd party team Tibron who like with their Madden ports did a fab job and improved over the PS version with extra features and various improvements to the game

Blades
12-17-2017, 07:24 AM
Thanks for the information everyone. I've always wondered about this topic and have searched high and low for this information, and couldn't find anything of substance.


I dont think Saturn Croc was a port. I think it was actually the leading platform, IIRC. Also, compared with most stuff on the system, Saturn Croc is pretty impressive. Problem is, people like comparing it with the Playstation version.

Croc is one of my favorite games. Fox Interactive developed the three ports (PC, PSX, Saturn) in parallel with different teams.


Here's some Saturn screenshots to whet your Croc appetite. The game's
coming along nicely, and we hope to preview a playable version sometime
before E3 in two weeks. Watch out, Yoshi, There's a new cold-blooded
hero in town. Fox Interactive introduces Croc, a 3D platformer, for the
Saturn. Croc is a cute, young crocodile sporting a camping backpack and
a fanged overbite. His buddies, the Gobbos (Muppet-style furballs) have
been captured and need rescuing. Croc needs to traverse the four islands
to save them. The game features a full 3D engine in the same vein as
N64's Mario. You can run, jump, and swim almost anywhere. You can even
adjust the camera angles to get a better perspective on the given
situations. There's over 40 levels in this game, including a hidden
island that appears only when you've rescued every single one of your
friends. The folks at Fox Interactive showed us the current progress of
the Playstation version. It's a very impressive game that seems to
borrow heavily from past successes, namely Mario and Crash Bandicoot.
All versions - Playstation, Win95, and Saturn - will be totally original
programming (meaning the Saturn version will not be a port) and should
be available at the same time. The Saturn version is trailing behind
about two weeks in development, but Fox assures us that Saturn Croc will
be as equally impressive as the Playstation's. We hope to see a Saturn
version shortly.

From here. (https://groups.google.com/forum/#!search/croc$20saturn/rec.games.video.sega/_Q1l6xoD4hs/6s7zI3N9HlYJ)

The PC and PSX ports came out great, but the Saturn port was delayed and had a number of issues. It appears to be based on an earlier build, runs significantly slower, certain geography and enemies are removed (probably for performance reasons), transparencies are removed (of course), and draw distance is very very low in the later levels. Lighting is also the worst of all three. There are other issues as well. I have played all three ports to 100%. I think the Saturn was capable of better.

The only element the Saturn has that the others don't is an atmosphere "floor" for some reason.

Why was the Saturn as complex as it is? According to Eidolon's Inn, the Saturn was designed too early and really was designed for 2D work with modest 3D because 3D was the responsibility of the arcade division. When the 3D-ready PSX was announced in late 1993 the team was caught off guard as they were probably expecting something along the lines of the 3DO, and had to redesign the already aged Saturn to compete with a short time frame, and this is how the parallel processing came about (not because of the arcade boards which were not based on parallel processing as I had thought); as a quick way to power up the original spec.


A redesigned Saturn that could successfully compete with the PlayStation was going to have to be made from off-the-shelf parts using whatever Sega had available in order to meet deadline, and this where the concept of parallel processing enters the picture. The Away Team chose this as the most expedient shortcut towards getting a redesigned yet decently priced 32-bit console out the door in the shortest amount of time. Instead of the single NEC V60, they went with dual Hitachi SH-2s in parallel - supposedly as a favor to an old golfing buddy of Nakayama's. Instead of the single VDPs of the earlier arcade boards, they went with beefed-up dual VDPs - each of which could be programmed for dedicated tasks. If this strikes you as odd, please bear in mind that parallel processing was an old concept to Sega's engineers. Many of Sega arcade hits from the 1980s, such as AfterBurner II and OutRun, utilized twin Motorola MC68000s in their board design. The Mega CD (Sega CD) can in fact be said to be Sega's first-ever dual processor console, since its internal MC68000 worked in tandem with the MC68000 of its host MegaDrive (Genesis) console. The Saturn was to be Sega's first purpose-built dual-processor console.


The original Saturn spec as it has been described in some accounts seems to owes most of its design to two of Sega's newest arcade boards at the time. Both Sega System32 and its immediate successor, the famous Sega Model 1 arcade board, were based around the 32-bit NEC V60 16 MHz CPU. Both designs had single CPUs and single VDPs, with fairly straightforward design architecture.

I think this answers the question of why an innovative team designed such a complex architecture, not as a bespoke machine aimed for gaming quality, but for time reasons.

Team Andromeda
12-17-2017, 08:19 AM
How long was the Sega Saturn relevant from a technical standpoint?

It seems like in mid-1997 developers just stopped caring, with the half-assed ports of Doom and Croc reaching store shelves. Even Sonic Jam has excessive slowdown. I imagine this is because the hardware had become too convoluted to spend time figuring out. Sega was developing the Dreamcast at this point anyway.

It also appears that the Saturn was competitive at launch in late 1994 (in Japan) and late 1995 (in US).

When exactly did the Saturn stop being relevant in the US? In Japan?

Sure, there were great games released exclusively in Japan for years after 1997, but few of them taxed the Saturn with a few notable exceptions (Radiant Silvergun).
.

Mid 1997 when SEGA started to look to the DC, but sorry DOOM wasn't a half hassed port, but a port that was running at 60 fps and looking better than the PS and PC versions, untill id demanded that Rage not use the custom GFX hardware of the Saturn, but it had to be done in software via the CPU's . Croc was a nice port and did use have some new Midi sound effects and used the VDP II to have moving lava and the like, but it was a port of a game build around the PS harwdare and so was going to lose out Also it wasn't just RSG that pused the Saturn hard in 1997. The likes of Grandia, Cotton Boomerang, K1 Fighting, Street Fighter Zero 3, Savaki, Dead Or Alive, Go Go Goal, Syutokoh Battle 97, D-Xhird, Last Bronx, Astra Super Stars, Princess Crown, Winter Heat, World League Soccer 98, Quake, Sonic R, Layer Section II, Bulk Slash , Shining Force III parts 1, 2,3 and many more really pushed the Saturn hard in 97 and beyond

Team Andromeda
12-17-2017, 08:34 AM
I think this answers the question of why an innovative team designed such a complex architecture, not as a bespoke machine aimed for gaming quality, but for time reasons.

Model 1 was far from straightforward.It had 4 Fujitsu DSP and another 2 co-processors along with its CPU to handle the data and was hugely complex. Its like people don't know that before it joined up with the Lockheed its Arcade boards used a host of CPU and processors to handle the GFX, I mean the Y board along used 3 68000 CPU's, that without the sound hardware.
Saturn was always going to handle 3D and that's why SEGA went with SH-2. No doubt after they were caught out with the spec of the PS (unless you believe the crap from TOM) , they added another SH-2 to help boost the power of the system.

Blades
12-17-2017, 08:49 AM
Mid 1997 when SEGA started to look to the DC, but sorry DOOM wasn't a half hassed port, but a port that was running at 60 fps and looking better than the PS and PC versions, untill id demanded that Rage not use the custom GFX hardware of the Saturn

The Saturn could obviously handle Doom, but my point was that Sega and co. just stopped caring in 1997 and greenlit the Doom we got, not to mention Virtua Racing being handled by an external developer (and awfully).


Saturn was always going to handle 3D and that's why SEGA went with SH-2. No doubt after they were caught out with the spec of the PS (unless you believe the crap from TOM) , they added another SH-2 to help boost the power of the system.

This is what I don't understand. No one else was focusing on parallel processing in home consoles or even PCs, much less quads. Quads make sense as a relative to the arcade 3D boards, but what made them take such a rapid departure from their own lineage to make Saturn such a complex parallel machine that they never really tamed?

The only explanation I can think of given the evidence is that the Saturn was designed in 1992-1993 primarily for 2D with modest 1993-era 3D, then once news of the PSX hit, was quickly beefed up like the 32X did the Genesis.


Croc was a nice port and did use have some new Midi sound effects and used the VDP II to have moving lava and the like, but it was a port of a game build around the PS harwdare and so was going to lose out

According to Saturn World, the Saturn port (and all the others) were built from the ground up for their respective platforms. I don't know how true that is.

Team Andromeda
12-17-2017, 10:43 AM
The Saturn could obviously handle Doom, but my point was that Sega and co. just stopped caring in 1997 and greenlit the Doom we got, not to mention Virtua Racing being handled by an external developer

Doom was nothing at all to do with SEGA and all to do with the corp that help the IP rights and how id told the team the make the Saturn version, even if SEGA Japan did the port their selfs it would have made little difference, if id would not allow the Saturn VDP 1 and II to handle the game. And AM#2 were busy on other projects including trying to make Shenmue, so the VR Port was handed out, since the CS team that handled the 32X port were busy on Rally. So its rather silly to bring that up as SEGA AM#2 didnt handle the DC port of games like Fighting Vipers II or VF3tb, becasue they were busy on other stuff, did that mean SEGA and AM#2 didn't care with the DC ?


No one else was focusing on parallel processing in home consoles or even PCs, much less quads.

SEGA were in the Arcades and that's the way they went with the Saturn. Also Nvidia 1st GFX card used quads, as did 3DO and SEGA Model 1 and 2 Arcade boards, Model 3 did too but could handle both. And please lets not make out that The Mega CD was easy to make games on, with that system its self using 2 CPU's along with 2 sound systems and also the MD GPU and another GPU inside the Mega CD, talk about a multi chip set up of 2 GFX units, 2 sound boards, and 2 CPU's . SEGA X and Y Arcade boards also using multiple CPUs too. That how SEGA did it stuff before it went to Lockheed Martin in 1994.


According to Saturn World, the Saturn port (and all the others) were built from the ground up for their respective platforms

The game let and came out on the PS 1st. The Saturn was just a port, but did make some use of the Saturn Midi sound system for better sound and also the VDP II to have the lava following and moving, unlike the PS version. But it was still just a port and nothing more

Blades
12-17-2017, 11:31 AM
Doom was nothing at all to do with SEGA and all to do with the corp that help the IP rights and how id told the team the make the Saturn version, even if SEGA Japan did the port their selfs it would have made little difference, if id would not allow the Saturn VDP 1 and II to handle the game.

True, but then they would've (should've) canceled it.


And AM#2 were busy on other projects including trying to make Shenmue, so the VR Port was handed out, since the CS team that handled the 32X port were busy on Rally. So its rather silly to bring that up as SEGA AM#2 didnt handle the DC port of games like Fighting Vipers II or VF3tb, becasue they were busy on other stuff, did that mean SEGA and AM#2 didn't care with the DC ?

The difference is those ports were good.


SEGA were in the Arcades and that's the way they went with the Saturn. Also Nvidia 1st GFX card used quads, as did 3DO and SEGA Model 1 and 2 Arcade boards

True. It's worth mentioning that Nvidia was partnered with Sega at the time, so it would make sense they used quads.


And please lets not make out that The Mega CD was easy to make games on, with that system its self using 2 CPU's along with 2 sound systems and also the MD GPU and another GPU inside the Mega CD, talk about a multi chip set up of 2 GFX units, 2 sound boards, and 2 CPU's . SEGA X and Y Arcade boards also using multiple CPUs too. That how SEGA did it stuff before it went to Lockheed Martin in 1994.

True, but indeed the relevant arcade boards at the time (System 32 and Model 1/2) were single CPU.



The game let and came out on the PS 1st. The Saturn was just a port, but did make some use of the Saturn Midi sound system for better sound and also the VDP II to have the lava following and moving, unlike the PS version. But it was still just a port and nothing more

Argonaut was adamant that the versions were not ports. However, Croc was definitely not optimized for the Saturn.

Team Andromeda
12-17-2017, 12:42 PM
True, but then they would've (should've) canceled it.

Thats like saying Nintendo should have canceled Superman 64. The simple fact of the matter was, it was id that made Saturn doom the mess it was.


The difference is those ports were good.

That's becasue they were handled by good teams. AM#2 were busy on other stuff and TW payed for the rights . So it was easy money for SEGA and SEGA were quite rightly more interested in porting Daytona USA and Sega Rally to the Saturn themselfs.


True. It's worth mentioning that Nvidia was partnered with Sega at the time, so it would make sense they used quads.

SEGA was using Quads with Model 1. So


True, but indeed the relevant arcade boards at the time (System 32 and Model 1/2) were single CPU

Model 2 came after the Saturn and was a joint effort with an American corp and it showed as the USA was leading the world with 3D and 3D boards. Model 1 might have had one main CPU's but it had 2 co-processors and then another 4 separate DSP processors. Like the Saturn, it used multiple CPU and DSP and was also hard to programme and debug for. Anyone who knew SEGA history, would know that for its Arcade units and home systems SEGA liked to use multi CPU, GPU and sound boards to help power it's systems.


Argonaut was adamant that the versions were not ports

Of coruse it was a port or conversion. It came after the PS version and had no extra levels or new Gfx. It was just a straight port of the PS version and small use of Saturn extra backround and sound hardware/

Da_Shocker
12-17-2017, 01:07 PM
To the OP you have been registered on here since Dec 2006 and you have over 2K posts. This topic has been bought up like hundreds of times so I am not exactly sure how you missed out on it.

Blades
12-17-2017, 01:12 PM
Good points TA.


To the OP you have been registered on here since Dec 2006 and you have over 2K posts. This topic has been bought up like hundreds of times so I am not exactly sure how you missed out on it.

Sorry.

stu
12-17-2017, 02:09 PM
There was a PC graphics card based around the Saturn's 3D design. It was one of the 1st GPUs released by Nvidia for the PC.



Almost, the Saturn and NV1 chip both used Quads as their 3D primitives but there the similarities end. The NV1 was entirely an Nvidia design and shared no hardware with the Saturn. Sega and Nvidia started a relationship initially to convert the Saturn games over to the PC as a way of easing the reliance on consoles, they were pretty much the 1st Sega-PC games released. Sega and Nvidia also started to collaborate on a console design called "Saturn V08" and was based on the NV2 chip that Nvidia was developing. This system was either a very early prototype for the Dreamcast or possibly a SOA led attempt at replacing the Saturn early.

You can read more about Sega and Nvidia's relationship and about NV2 here.

https://web.archive.org/web/20110326050206/http://www.firingsquad.com/features/nv2/

gamevet
12-17-2017, 04:48 PM
I said based around, as in the use of quads instead of triangles.

j_factor
12-17-2017, 05:14 PM
The Saturn's commercial peak in North America was the end of 1996 and I'd say its lineup to that point, and maybe through Q1 1997, was pretty much on par with what was available for other consoles. Games like PD Zwei, NiGHTS, Daytona CCE were looking pretty good for the time, the system was still getting arcade ports with solid presentation that were widely praised like Virtual On and Virtua Cop 2, and solid games were coming out from western third-parties like EA, Eidos, Crystal Dynamics, and even Acclaim.

Starting in the Spring of '97 there were a ton of games getting canceled, and what did come out often felt half-assed. There were still a few technically solid games here and there but it was spotty at best. Even Sega arcade ports felt like they could have been better, like Sky Target for example.

Da_Shocker
12-17-2017, 05:35 PM
Good points TA.



Sorry.

lol nah you good though.

Barone
12-17-2017, 08:59 PM
The Saturn version of The Need for Speed was the best version of the game on consoles. It had slightly better textures than the 3DO and PlayStation versions, along with a much smoother frame-rate. It also had superior load times, compared to the PlayStation. I'll give a nod to the PlayStation version for having some cool lighting effects during the tunnel sequences, that were not present in the Saturn version.
Not really.

What the PS1 version has over the Saturn's:
- Higher frame rate (easier to notice the difference in split-screen mode).
- Higher speed sensation (track scrolls faster).
- Better quality videos and pictures.
- Superior lighting. Exclusive colored lighting effects and not only inside tunnels, but far superior time of day-based lighting (Saturn's just plays with the brightness of the whole track and changes the background colors). Also some draw-in lighting effect the other versions lack.
- Proper shadows (not only transparent car shadows, but Saturn version lacks track shadows over the cars in spots it had even in the 3DO version).
- Far better skid smoke effect (Saturn's is really bad).
- Background images featuring scaling and tilting effects.
- 12 music tracks vs 10 music tracks; and they loop properly.
- Full analog support.
- More hidden content: Arcade Mode (which makes the scrolling speed even higher and tweaks the physics a bit); Oasis Springs and Lunar Springs tracks; front and rear wing adjustments; machine gun cheat.
- Cars models seem a bit simplified on the Saturn:
----------------------------PS1----------------------------|--------------------------SAT--------------------------
https://i.imgur.com/p2QolVt.png https://i.imgur.com/fDEPoS1.png


Here's what Saturn version has over the PS1's:
- Non-dithered rendering.
- Sound effects have echo added to them inside tunnels and arguably better stereo panning (gear changes, for an example, are located on your right rather than in the center as in the PS1).
- Less seaming and texture warping issues.
- Menu has transition effects.
- Music tracks seem to have better audio quality.

Also, the Saturn version has an extra loading after you finish a race or race segment. ;)

gamevet
12-17-2017, 09:12 PM
Digital Foundry sort of disagrees. The PS version has an uncapped frame-rate, but that causes some jitter. They also noted that the image quality was slightly grainier on PS.
FjLXLhaGfFA&t

Barone
12-17-2017, 09:25 PM
Digital Foundry disagrees.
Lmao. Disagrees with what?
Have you even watched the whole video? I think you haven't.
'Cause it pretty much backs up the details I described.

Also, had you watched the video you'd notice he uses a Saturn version which has no in-game music and broken in-car displays. IDK if it's an earlier release or what, but certainly there are Saturn copies which have both features working.

gamevet
12-17-2017, 09:43 PM
I was talking about the smoothness of the frame-rate and the grainier image quality, which was brought up in the video.

Also, I'd already gave the nod to the the PS version for its lighting effects.


Yeah, something wasn't right with their Saturn copy. Mine had the music while racing.

BonusKun
12-18-2017, 04:34 AM
All I gave a shit about for the Saturn was it was the best system for Capcom CPSII Games.

zyrobs
12-22-2017, 09:18 PM
True, but indeed the relevant arcade boards at the time (System 32 and Model 1/2) were single CPU.

The model 1/2 used several DSPs as math co-processors, most probably for calculating all the 3d transform and lightning. I recall the Model 2 had something like five of them.

Mega Drive Bowlsey
01-19-2018, 02:41 PM
I'm gutted that Capcom cancelled Resident Evil 2 for the Saturn because I love the Saturn port of the original Resi. I'm a huge fan of Resi on the PS1 but years later when I played the Saturn port for the first time I actually preferred it. Not sure why they cancelled it either because I remember hearing that it was quite far into development when they pulled the plug, which begs the question of why not just finish it off and release it?! The comment by that idiot Bernie Stolar about the Saturn not being Sega's future probably didn't help but if it was far into development already at that point just finish it! So frustrating. :(

maxi
01-19-2018, 03:28 PM
I'm gutted that Capcom cancelled Resident Evil 2 for the Saturn because I love the Saturn port of the original Resi. I'm a huge fan of Resi on the PS1 but years later when I played the Saturn port for the first time I actually preferred it. Not sure why they cancelled it either because I remember hearing that it was quite far into development when they pulled the plug, which begs the question of why not just finish it off and release it?! The comment by that idiot Bernie Stolar about the Saturn not being Sega's future probably didn't help but if it was far into development already at that point just finish it! So frustrating. :(

It wasn't the final RE2, but that beta people call RE1.5, so makes sense after the various changes over all the game how it would be a bad investment reprogram several thing on both consoles with one of them with a small player base.

Mega Drive Bowlsey
01-19-2018, 03:37 PM
It wasn't the final RE2, but that beta people call RE1.5, so makes sense after the various changes over all the game how it would be a bad investment reprogram several thing on both consoles with one of them with a small player base.

Understood but any version of Resi 2 on my Sega Saturn is better than no version. I don't know, it just frustrates me because Capcom did such a great job porting the original Resi to the Saturn. Ah well...

Team Andromeda
01-22-2018, 02:50 PM
Understood but any version of Resi 2 on my Sega Saturn is better than no version. I don't know, it just frustrates me because Capcom did such a great job porting the original Resi to the Saturn. Ah well...

Capcom didn't handle the Saturn port In-House and also Capcom gave a very frank and open interview with the UK Sega Saturn Mag and because SEGA Japan were them selfs were moving away from the Saturn and backing the DC and the low sales of Saturn games (at that time) the move to cancel the Saturn port was taken. I was upset too, but given the retail position of the Saturn even in Japan at that time and the fact that ever SOJ was turning its support of the Saturn, all to the DC it made sense