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Thread: Warrior of Rome

  1. #1
    Blast processor Melf's Avatar
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    Meh Warrior of Rome

    Strategy games, while popular on PCs, went under a lot of gamerís radars during the 16-bit era. With releases like Warrior of Rome, itís easy to see why. Vague objectives and a dragging pace are just some of the problems plaguing this early title, and if war were actually like this, Caesar would never have left Italy. Read the full review for more details.

  2. #2
    Raging in the Streets A Black Falcon's Avatar
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    If you want the proper genre, this is a really simplistic hex-based wargame, yes? Certainly looks like it. That's a genre which is related to, but quite different from, strategy games like an RTS. That respawning enemies thing sounds horrible, though...

  3. #3
    Raging in the Streets goldenband's Avatar
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    It's not turn-based, though -- you issue orders to your units, and they fulfill them in real time. It's definitely closer to Herzog Zwei than Romance of the Three Kingdoms. I suppose you could argue that it's more of a "real-time tactical" game, but that's a somewhat academic distinction.

    It is very simplistic, though. And the respawning enemies are miserable, especially in the third mission, where you've got to tear down tons of barricades in order to get to your target. Thankfully they don't respawn in the fourth mission -- though since enemy deployment in that mission is all based around specific trigger squares, you could trial-and-error your way through most of that labyrinth.

  4. #4
    Raging in the Streets A Black Falcon's Avatar
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    Well, there is ground between the RTS and wargame genres. You have to look at each game to see which side it goes on. For instance, Sid Meier's Gettysburg! and its sequels (Antietam!, Waterloo, Austerlitz) are considered wargames, even though they're real-time and don't have hexes either. However, Myth or Ground Control are RTSes, even though they don't have any base building or resource management, because they play more like RTSes than wargames. Interface, etc. is a part of it too. Maybe I should try a little of Warrior of Rome and see what I think...

    For another example, I'd put battles in the Total War series somewhere right on the borderline between RTS and wargame.

  5. #5
    (formerly known as 5233) Master of Shinobi Jeckidy's Avatar
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    Indeed, one of the worst games I have played on the Genesis. This would make a bottom 100 list of mine quite easily. The second did improve on the original quite a bit, however. There was also an unreleased third entry, appearantly.

    Also notice that the japanese title, Caeser no Yabou, is an appearant attempt to ripoff the title of Nobunaga no Yabou, otherwise known in the US as "Nobunaga's Ambition".

  6. #6
    Raging in the Streets goldenband's Avatar
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    Thanks for confirming my low opinion of the game! Yeah, I've got the second game and have been meaning to give it a whirl. Actually, buying WOR II is what convinced me that I needed to finally play through my copy of WOR, since it felt silly to collect the second game in a series without actually playing the first.

    I noticed the similarity to Nobunaga no Yabou, but I wasn't sure whether "no yabou" is a highly distinctive formulation ŗ la "Super [anything] Brothers", or something more like の伝説 (no densetsu) which seems less unequivocally identified with the Zelda series.

  7. #7
    What? Shir is gone? Raging in the Streets StarMist's Avatar
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    Crisp review with, in the Bard's quotations, a predictable measure of class totally contrary my own reviewing slant .
    Funny, that misleading manual isn't unique. I've too few complete copies of games I owned way back when to jog memory and very seldom read manuals anymore but I've certainly owned games that misled me. Perhaps partly why I ceased reading them.
    This game is so awful from graphics to gameplay that I'd never have remembered it a Genny game w/o the review--that's when it all came barfing back up on me--and would've had to guess it some awful DOS freeware if it ever came to mind on its own. Iirc I rented it once on the heels of having enjoyed Shingen the Ruler. Bah.

  8. #8
    Raging in the Streets goldenband's Avatar
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    Thank you!

    And yes, there's definitely a non-zero number of misleading manuals out there, though Warrior of Rome is one of the few I can remember that are outright perfidious. Faery Tale Adventure has mistakes in the walkthrough, and I seem to remember that one of the action games I beat recently was 100% wrong about something in the gameplay...can't remember which, though.

    Even so, I've become a manual-and-map guy even if I don't always bother reading them beforehand (or systematically). There are too many games that bite you with unexpected gotchas if you don't know what's happening -- the final boss fight in Jewel Master is a minor example -- and conversely, games that actually become fun if you do know what's happening from the start. The Disney games often have quirks that are only noted in the manual, and aren't obvious at all during gameplay.

  9. #9
    Raging in the Streets A Black Falcon's Avatar
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    So um, I found a copy of the sequel and picked it up. Is Warrior of Rome II any better than the first one? I do see that it has battery save (and 15-20 maps, not 4), which is nice... I like that you can resize the menus and move them around the screen, too. The gameplay itself looks complex though, I'll need to figure it out.

  10. #10
    Raging in the Streets goldenband's Avatar
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    Ever since playing through & reviewing WOR I've been planning on giving it a shot, but my hopes aren't exactly high! I do need to start a new RPG or strategy game soon, though, so maybe...

  11. #11
    Hedgehog-in-Training Hedgehog-in-Training
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    On level three, should I take the northern bridges and advance west that way or should I take another route?

    I forgot to mention, I played this game originally as a kid and liked it much more than WOR II. WOR II is all about base building and spamming pudgy little Roman guys until the enemy breaks. The endless maps become boring and annoying. WOR is much more faster pace when you change the game speed to max. I finished the first 2 levels in ~2.5 hours.

    I liked WOR much better than Genghis Khan and Operation Europe. Both of those games were much slower and unbearable. Centurion: Defender of Rome puts them all to shame but I still like WOR more than the others (GK,OE,WOR II).

    A simple tip to get you through level one:

    Use 2 inf. and 1 engineer in the northern barracks to build 2 walls across the 2 bridges in the north. Keep the units locked inside the island compound and rebuild the walls as the enemy tries to destroy them. I also post 2 units from the eastern barracks on the outside of the eastern wall. I use all the other units as hit and run on the pirate ships and destroy them one by one.

    When the pirates are down to the last ship I dismantle the western wall in the north and add the last 2 infantry to the final push.

    Level two naval battle is easy:

    Use the fast movement to close with and engage the enemy ships while your troopship travels along a preset course controlled by AI. You can track its path by highlighting the ship. The wind blows your fighting units off course but it's easily fixed with fast movement.
    Last edited by Fozzy; 05-31-2016 at 08:25 AM.

  12. #12
    Raging in the Streets goldenband's Avatar
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    I ended up beating Warrior of Rome a second time in 2013. It went quicker than the first time (especially since I understood how the missile units worked), but I still found it tedious and one-dimensional. It's a good thing they included a RAM disk -- Level 4 would be almost unplayable without it.

    I liked Warrior of Rome II a lot. It's slow, sure, but it's partly meant to be that way -- your units start out slow, and get faster as things go on, because they learn tasks by doing. The gameplay worked for me, and I think they did a good job of adapting RTS mechanics to a console without deluging the player with too many options; the building blocks are simple, but the dynamics are complex.

    Operation Europe is pretty rough -- I've never been able to get much of anywhere with it -- but I do like Genghis Khan II, Gemfire, and other turn-based Koei games that aren't 100% military. Romance of the Three Kingdoms is one of my favorite NES games; I still need to take on the Genesis entries in the series.

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