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Thread: A European look on the Sega VS Nintendo war by Kim Justice

  1. #31
    Road Rasher KimbleJustice's Avatar
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    Some really cool and interesting comments here!*. Glad that you guys liked it anyways and nice to see a lot of extra information from other countries around - admittedly my one was always going to veer closer to the UK for obvious reasons so I appreciate the picture from Germany, France and what have you...and it's obviously fresher than Blast Processing. I'd also like to say that the Amstrad failed in the UK because fuck Alan Sugar, but alas it didn't so I can't. In fact it kinda helped stabilise the market after a bit of a rough patch in the mid 80's...



    *Except for gamevet, who can go piss on a wire

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    Funny thing about the Amstrad from a German perspective: In Germany, the CPC was distributed nut by amstrad themselves, but by a local electronics distributor spezcialising on computers, Schneider - so it wasn't known as the Amstrad CPC, but the Schneider CPC. When it arrived in '84, it was celebrated by magazines as being the one machine that finally could break the dominance the ageing C64 still held over the market (probably spurred on by the fact that the C16, the C116 and the Plus/4 tanked horribly). Indeed, Schneider did pretty good, I think in the years 1985 and '86 it was the third best-selling computer in Germany (though I don't have any concise numbers at hand).

    However in 1988, Schneider and Amstrad cut ties, forcing Amstrad to distribute their machines by themselves in germany (which they immensely struggled to do). I don't know the reasons behind the divide, but I believe it was because in '86 and '87, 16bit computers gaining in popularity and pretty much all 8bit sales (aside from the C64) slumped. Also, Schneider presumably figured it was better for them to go forward producing their own Dos-compatible PC systems instead of distributing Amstrad PCs. So Schneider dropped 8bit computers entirely and started their own PC line (their Euro PC), leaving Amstrad to run and cobble together a distribution line of their own in Germany (which they pretty much failed to do). It's hard to find any detailed info on this, but whatever little you can pick up looks pretty messy IMO.
    The funny thing about an oxymoron is, even if you remove the ox, there'll always be a moron. The Question Remains: Y?

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    _-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_-_ Master of Shinobi NeoZeedeater's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimbleJustice View Post
    Some really cool and interesting comments here!*. Glad that you guys liked it anyways and nice to see a lot of extra information from other countries around - admittedly my one was always going to veer closer to the UK for obvious reasons so I appreciate the picture from Germany, France and what have you...and it's obviously fresher than Blast Processing. I'd also like to say that the Amstrad failed in the UK because fuck Alan Sugar, but alas it didn't so I can't. In fact it kinda helped stabilise the market after a bit of a rough patch in the mid 80's...
    I just watched your Amstrad video. It's really well put together and I find the whole topic fascinating as the system was non-existent in my part of the world. I have only played it emulated but I have tried tons of games. Sir Lancelot is probably my favourite game for it (and better than the Spectrum version) so I always try to recommend it puzzle platformer fans.

    And Alan Sugar does seem like a douche.

  4. #34
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    If a British computer had to come to France, I'd much rather have got the Acorn Archimedes. Sadly, this great computer is totally unknown here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by KimbleJustice View Post
    Some really cool and interesting comments here!*. Glad that you guys liked it anyways and nice to see a lot of extra information from other countries around - admittedly my one was always going to veer closer to the UK for obvious reasons so I appreciate the picture from Germany, France and what have you...and it's obviously fresher than Blast Processing. I'd also like to say that the Amstrad failed in the UK because fuck Alan Sugar, but alas it didn't so I can't. In fact it kinda helped stabilise the market after a bit of a rough patch in the mid 80's...
    Ah, so you have a Sega 16 account. I'm a fan of that avatar and recall seeing it here before. As for you vids, I only so far seen this European look one, followed by the Jungle Strike vid. I was surprised you liked blowing stuff up so much in Jungle Strike. Made a mental note to check out some other vids later, like the Streets of Rage series, among others.

    And hey, I loved Blast Processing adverts. But that one popular Sega ad you showed for Europe was pretty cool too.


    Might as well add my European view. I was born 1980 Romania, raised in smaller town of Cenad bordering Hungry. Never even knew what a videogame was. Came to Canada later in '89. Remember one day our dad taking us to see our neighbours and seen the 2 kids around the TV. Seen Mario 1 on NES for the first time. Mind. Blown. Needless to say, videogames saved my youth living in Canada. Because when I was in Europe, my childhood was all about the great outdoors. Not so much in Canada. So thank goodness for videogames. Otherwise I probably would of been a drug addict or something.

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    Raging in the Streets
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    Quote Originally Posted by KimbleJustice View Post
    I'd also like to say that the Amstrad failed in the UK because fuck Alan Sugar, but alas it didn't so I can't. In fact it kinda helped stabilise the market after a bit of a rough patch in the mid 80's...
    Damn, i'm a 90s baby so all of that is a bit behind my times, my experience of old 80s British computers is my Dads dusty old Spectrum he had in his attic, I was pretty excited to turn it on and play some old Speccy games but it didn't work so he threw it away. Total bummer. My grandparents had a C64 which for some reason I never liked at the time because the Amiga was the thing to own and the C64 was meh in comparison, but I was just a kid then, the C64 is great.

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    Bite my shiny, metal ***! Hero of Algol retrospiel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phantar View Post
    Starting in 1989, you could buy a "membership card" in stores or by filling out a coupon within a GameBoy- or NES-game, and thus gain a subscription to the Club Nintendo Magazine, which was basically the german version of Nintendo power. The first Sega-centered magazine, with the original name "Sega Magazin", only arrived here in 1993, four years later. Sega did give Nintendo a run for their money eventually, but they certainly had a harder time.
    I read GAMERS which was a Sega-only mag and quite nice, at least during the earlier days (1991 - 1993). I will agree that Club Nintendo was an excellent tool to keep people interested in new Nintendo products. It really helped building momentum for the SNES.
    The Mega Drive was far inferior to the NES in terms of diffusion rate and sales in the Japanese market, though there were ardent Sega users. But in the US and Europe, we knew Sega could challenge Nintendo. We aimed at dominating those markets, hiring experienced staff for our overseas department in Japan, and revitalising Sega of America and the ailing Virgin group in Europe.

    Then we set about developing killer games.

    - Hayao Nakayama, Mega Drive Collected Works (p. 17)

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    I noticed downloading videogame magazine scans, that UK had better magazines. The only real good magazine in Canada for me was GameFan. EGM was ok. And GamePro was so garbage in every category.

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    EDGE used to be a good read back in the day, it might be now but I haven't read a copy since maybe 2007, I picked up the first 19 issues of Retro Gamer before the hiatus and that was a fantastic read however, some of their articles and interviews were super in-depth and it was just a fantastic read every time. Used to give away some awesome content with it too.

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    Master of Shinobi Soulis's Avatar
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    In Greece we had lots of imported UK videogame magazines. We also had some translated American magazines like Gamepro but those sucked. The best one for me was C&VG (especially from late 1995 to 1997). EDGE had great articles but the reviews were meh. I also loved the Unofficial N64 magazine back in the day but now that i'm revisiting my old mags with a more critical eye, i think it kinda sucks. The Saturn UK mag though. That was a great one. Even though i never had a Saturn back then, i'm enjoying those old magazines now very much. I heard somewhere that the Saturn was more successful in UK, compared to other countries in Europe, thanks to that magazine.

    Anyway, now i have a large collection of games/computers magazines from UK, US and Greece (from 1981 up to 2000) in PDF form. I'd say UK had the best console mags but i still prefer our own home/computer mags. Can't say that i like any US magazine.

    By the way, Kim, have you thought about making an episode about videogame magazines in UK?
    Last edited by Soulis; 04-05-2016 at 05:30 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Soulis View Post
    By the way, Kim, have you thought about making an episode about videogame magazines in UK?
    That's a great idea.

  12. #42
    Road Rasher KimbleJustice's Avatar
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    There is one particular magazine (that being Amiga Power) that I will definitely be doing a proper overview on at some point because there is just so much to talk about there. Probably a couple of other bits and pieces too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bultje112 View Post
    that is strange as I've often been to spain (in later) years and have always been amazed at how much sega stuff could be acquired. to my knowledge nintendo, outside of gameboy, was never a factor in spain and the same for portugal and italy. I've also spoken to numerous people in thse nations confirming that.
    And it was that way definitely. I don't have exact figures but I'd say both the Master System and the Mega Drive were ahead of the NES and the SNES in sales and only regarding portable systems you could notice the Game Boy was more widespread than the Game Gear. I suppose it wasn't like in the UK but the Sega consoles had better sales definitely, althought the Master System achieved it by means of the cheaply prized Master System II which was sold like hotcakes during the Mega Drive lifespan.

    As for the computers, I'd say the ZX Spectrum was clearly the leading one regarding 8-bit computers, followed by the MSX and the Amstrad CPC. Commodore 64 was never very relevant here. And regarding the 16-bit computers, it seems that neither the Amiga nor the Atari ST enjoyed the same huge following than they had in other European countries and both were way below PCs regarding computer gaming.
    http://www.sega-16.com/forum/image.php?type=sigpic&userid=154&dateline=15683853  53

  14. #44
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    My experience off growing up in the UK is that nobody ever owned Nintendo anything except the Game Boy, the Nintendo 64 was hardly even a thing. You went over to your mates place to play games then they probably had a Playstation, and their older brother before that had a Megadrive

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    Extreme Procrastinator Master of Shinobi Flygon's Avatar
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    That seems incredibly strange, to me. As a child, I knew more people with Nintendo 64s than PSX's, in Australia! However, it's worth noting that most of my childhood took place in the late 90s/early 00s. This might be causing demographic bias (ie. children more likely to want a 64 than a PSX).

    I never knew anyone with a Saturn.

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