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Thread: Sega Chess

  1. #16
    Japanese Sonic CD FTW!!! Master of Shinobi Ecco's Avatar
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    Game Gear

    goldenband: That's a lot of info, but just to respond to a few things:

    GG Chessmaster: I'm not sure why you said that it lacks an Opening Book... when it's literally one of its options, "Opening Book."(Are you saying that its "Opening Book" doesn't count, or something.)

    Also: Yes GG Chessmaster does take longer for its more difficult situations, when it's on top difficulty. Especially at the end of the game, but IIRC even then, it would typically move within 45 minutes or so. So it's definitely not game-breaking imo...

    Also, again, Master System's "Sega Chess" is just unplayable on top-difficulty, as mentioned, that it literally wants DAYS PER MOVE.

    Which I would have thought means that you can't ALSO complain that Chessmaster's top-difficulty wants a max of 45min - an hour (for its hardest moves at the end of the match. Because again, it can do MOST moves in about 20 minutes).

    Glitches: You're probably referring to how leaving it on for DAYS at a time, plus doing a ton of replaying back and forth, may break it (i.e. glitch the pieces wrong). Well, it clearly wasn't made for that (or tested for that), apparently.

    The good part is that such glitches won't happen without leaving it on for something like 20 hours... which is probably not how most people would try to play (but I've done that for example, if starting a game in the early morning, and then leaving it on, all day, then resuming at night, etc.).

    So yeah you can't really push it toward extreme stretches of time, unfortunately, but I also don't imagine this comes up very often...

    ...

    If you don't find "Sega Chess" to be ugly then you've got a different set of eyes from mine, and that's fine, but it's no exaggeration that I find it very unpleasant to look at, and it ruins the experience for me.

    So what's the ideal way to evaluate a chess engine? To have it play to its maximum strength, yes, but with a time limit for both the human and CPU players -- whether you both get 5 minutes, 30 minutes, or 2 hours for the game. If you each get 5 minutes, then you're testing its play at fast time controls; give it 2 hours, and it's a fair test of its "classical" chess chops.

    Since Sega Chess and Chessmaster offer no option for timed play, the only thing we can do is to let it exhaust its available RAM for each move. But I don't think the fact that Chessmaster GG exhausts its RAM quicker than Sega Chess should be held against the latter game.

    Really, Infinite isn't the way that most people will use the game -- they'll play on whatever difficulty best matches their skill level -- and it's not an enjoyable or practical way to play for fun. It's an interesting data point to see how it plays on Infinite, but otherwise its only value is as a means of testing the absolute strength of the engine (or of using it to deeply analyze a position for you, but now we have Stockfish etc.), and from a player's perspective its inclusion is almost kind of irritating.
    ^All very interesting, good points. The timed gameplay does sound like it would be a good way to compare different chess videogames, but for those that lack that option, we still don't have a perfect way.

    Also, I used to play GG Chessmaster on Infinite, all the time... I just enjoyed it while watching a movie or doing other things (as the game moves usually within like 15-20min).

    Also re: Master System "Sega Chess:" Since its Infinite is unplayable, did you find a good level to play on?
    Last edited by Ecco; 03-29-2020 at 02:00 AM.

  2. #17
    Japanese Sonic CD FTW!!! Master of Shinobi Ecco's Avatar
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    Also this has been mentioned elsewhere but I used to enjoy Genesis Chess on top-difficulty, which never seems to take longer than 5 minutes or so, per move.

    I'd be playing for practicing / learning, so I'd take back bad moves, & re-do them with better moves. It's been a few years, but I don't think that I tried winning legitimate matches in top-difficulty; it just wasn't what I was doing.

    Anyway my point is that I've certainly enjoyed top-difficulty in GG Chessmaster, and Genesis Chess, and Apple Chess currently, so I'm surprised if you don't consider such a setting as a viable option...

    I always though it was a great way to practice / learn... while losing, for the most part, of course lol.

  3. #18
    Japanese Sonic CD FTW!!! Master of Shinobi Ecco's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldenband View Post
    I'll need to give Sega Chess a shot and see what I think! I'm one of the posters on that AtariAge thread, as I mentioned to Aleste privately, and playing these older games -- and beating them on max difficulty with the Black pieces -- is a project of mine.

    I don't expect every older chess engine to be terribly strong, but I think it ought to have a decent opening book -- to save users some time if a well-known line is played -- and I think it ought to be designed such that when checkmate approaches, it speeds up calculations.

    It's terribly irritating when you're three moves from checkmating the CPU by force, and it insists on cogitating at length, as though its demise weren't inevitable at that point.

    BTW "infinite" mode on the Chessmaster games kicks out a move eventually, it just takes a while (hours, potentially). No idea what the 32-bit games do, since at least the 8- and 16-bit games have an easily-reached hard limit based on available RAM.
    Well FWIW on Game Gear, The Chessmaster never took more than about an hour to move, IIRC, on its Infinite. And most moves took far less, like 15-20min. for most moves.

    Which I always thought was very decent...

  4. #19
    Raging in the Streets goldenband's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ecco View Post
    GG Chessmaster: I'm not sure why you said that it lacks an Opening Book... when it's literally one of its options, "Opening Book."(Are you saying that its "Opening Book" doesn't count, or something.)
    The Chessmaster GG opening book appears to be broken, sadly. Or, more correctly, it seems to be only one move deep.

    On NES Chessmaster, I can get as much as 10-11 moves deep in certain openings like the Ruy Lopez, and have the CPU responding instantly or near-instantly (1-2 seconds max.) even on high difficulty settings -- a sign that the CPU is working from its opening book. I just tried this and got 7 moves into the main line of the Sicilian Najdorf, 1. e4 c5 2. Nf3 d6 3. d4 cxd4 4. Nxd4 Nf6 5. Nc3 a6 6. Bg5 e6 7. Qd2, before the CPU started thinking for itself.

    In Sega Chess on the SMS, I just tried the same thing...and got the exact same results, interestingly enough: same opening from the CPU, and same depth before the CPU started having to think. (Maybe that suggests they share some things under the hood?)

    In Chessmaster on the GG, it does respond instantly on move 1 with 1...e5. But as soon as we reach move 2 -- 1. e4 e5 2. Nf3 -- it hunkers down for a big think, and takes several minutes before coming up with 2...Nf6, the Petroff Defense. A perfectly correct move, but the CPU is having to come up with it on its own -- meaning that the alleged opening book is, it seems, only one move deep. :/

    When I then played 3. Nxe5, Chessmaster GG eventually came up with the well-known error 3...Nxe4?, confirming that it's making this up as it goes along. So, it wastes the player's time by forcing them to wait for the CPU in extremely well-known opening positions, as early as move 2: not good.

    It's possible I've got a bad or variant GG ROM (though the MD5 matches known-good dumps). There are two different revisions of the NES Chessmaster ROM, and the one I had as a kid appears to have been the later one: the initial revision has a shallow opening book, while the later one knows at least one line of the Ruy Lopez 14-15 moves deep (!!), like the cart I had as a kid. (I just tried this to confirm.)

    This points to another issue: when the CPU responds instantly, players know they're still playing "known" moves. It's better to learn openings by playing them, as I did with NES Chessmaster as a kid. That game, and Sega Chess, give valuable feedback about whether you're on solid ground or have wandered off-trail. GG Chessmaster can't do that, apparently.

    So unless there's something weird happening on my end, it looks like the claim in the GG manual about the Opening Book option, and how it lets "the Chessmaster...consult over 150,000 chess moves to devise his opening strategy" may just be a lie.

    My guess? They simply cut the opening book to save on ROM space, ergo costs -- but left a bare remnant in place (the first move), as well as the menu option.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ecco View Post
    GG Chessmaster does take longer for its more difficult situations, when it's on top difficulty. Especially at the end of the game, but IIRC even then, it would typically move within 45 minutes or so. So it's definitely not game-breaking imo...

    Also, again, Master System's "Sega Chess" is just unplayable on top-difficulty, as mentioned, that it literally wants DAYS PER MOVE.
    I think the question here is whether each game paints Infinite difficulty as "the thing you have to beat in order to beat the game", or as a tool. In other words, is it meant to be played, or is it meant to be used to analyze positions?

    NES Chessmaster groups Infinite together with the other difficulties. When you beat the longest non-infinite game mode, it says "Now try a game at a higher level", which sure makes it sound like Infinite is the last and final stop -- but beating Infinite gives you the exact same message! Cheap move, Chessmaster.

    GG Chessmaster also groups Infinite with the other difficulties, but gives you no congratulatory message when you win on any difficulty. Sigh.

    Sega Chess separates Infinite Think mode out a bit more -- it comes after Adaptive, the mode where the CPU adjusts to your strength (presumably by giving itself less time). It congratulates you when you win, on whatever difficulty.

    A comparison of what the manuals say about Infinite mode is also interesting:

    NES: "In Infinite mode, the Chessmaster will think about his best move until you activate Force Chessmaster to Move."
    SNES (included just for comparison's sake): "Infinite: The Chessmaster thinks about its move until you select Force Chessmaster to Move."
    GG: "At the Infinite level, the Chessmaster will think over his next move until you activate him with the Force Move option (see page 12)."
    Sega Chess (machine-translated from Portuguese): "Infinite Reflection mode: it literally means that the MASTER SYSTEM will think infinitely until ordered to make a move. You should make the best move using the corresponding icon."


    None of these are true -- the CPU does eventually move, presumably when available RAM is exhausted. But clearly these manuals present Infinite mode as "the CPU thinks forever", which sends a weirdly ambiguous signal: are you really meant to play these, or just use them for analysis?

    As a side note, if you beat Chessmaster NES, it won't give you the "Congratulations!" message if you change difficulty settings while you play a game (or take back moves, etc.). In other words, from its perspective, you cheated. However, if you use "Force Move" during the game, it still gives you the win screen. That...surprises me!

    Quote Originally Posted by Ecco View Post
    Glitches: You're probably referring to how leaving it on for DAYS at a time, plus doing a ton of replaying back and forth, may break it (i.e. glitch the pieces wrong). Well, it clearly wasn't made for that (or tested for that), apparently.

    The good part is that such glitches won't happen without leaving it on for something like 20 hours... which is probably not how most people would try to play (but I've done that for example, if starting a game in the early morning, and then leaving it on, all day, then resuming at night, etc.).

    So yeah you can't really push it toward extreme stretches of time, unfortunately, but I also don't imagine this comes up very often...
    Well, as a reviewer, you kind of can't have your cake and eat it too on this one. Either Infinite mode is central to the gameplay experience, in which cases glitches are inexcusable; or it's not, in which case they're nearly irrelevant, but the game's "duration to RAM saturation" on Infinite is also irrelevant.

    I personally think Infinite is a niche feature -- one that interests me personally, but isn't as important as writing a program that respects the user's own time on all difficulties.

    FWIW the original release of Chessmaster on the Game Boy was super-glitchy -- a recurring problem with the portable editions of the franchise, I guess. The New Chessmaster was better, but neither version had a victory splash screen. Same disappointment as the Game Gear there, too.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ecco View Post
    re: Master System "Sega Chess:" Since its Infinite is unplayable, did you find a good level to play on?
    All the difficulties I tried -- Amateur, Professional, Grand Chess Master -- had reasonable time consumption that was proportionate to the strength being offered. That's another positive for this game, in my book: Infinite Think mode aside, it seems well-optimized to be played in one sitting, with a duration that's roughly the same as a normal tournament game at those levels.
    Last edited by goldenband; 03-29-2020 at 01:21 PM.

  5. #20
    Raging in the Streets goldenband's Avatar
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    Ha, it's interesting to compare how the old Intellivision game USCF Chess handled this. From the manual, page 4:

    • Levels 5 & 6 are for very serious chess players and the computer may take hours to decide on a move. If you choose Level 5 or 6, see "Timing Options" on page 12.
    • In Level 7 the computer continually looks for a better move until you force it to move. If you choose Level 7, see "Timing Options" on page 12.

    Then, on page 12, there's some setup stuff about making the CPU play a sound effect when you move, but this is the part that caught my eye:

    Force Move: Press the FORCE MOVE button on either hand controller and it forces the computer to immediately respond with the best move it has found. [...] When you press Force Move you are not playing at the skill level you chose. You are forcing the computer to move before it is ready. If you are forcing the computer to move often, you should play at a lower skill level.

    Brutal! But I'm surprised Chessmaster doesn't implement this, as USCF Chess is exactly right: forcing the move means you're not really playing on that difficulty level. If only they'd made Infinite actually be infinite, much of this whole discussion would rightly be moot.

  6. #21
    Road Rasher bigladiesman's Avatar
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    Such an in-depth and technically brilliant thread.
    For a guy who can't even move the horse correctly, this looks like a Fischer vs Kasparov game, and it's illustrative beyond the video game world.

  7. #22
    Hedgehog-in-Training Hedgehog-in-TrainingNameless One Aleste's Avatar
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    Game Gear Chessmaster is a 1mbit ROM, Sega Chess is 2mbit. With twice the space, that would support the theory that opening book had to be cut for the handheld version.

  8. #23
    Japanese Sonic CD FTW!!! Master of Shinobi Ecco's Avatar
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    goldenband: Thanks for clarifying why the GG Chessmaster "Opening Book" is not really measuring up, to being an opening book, despite being called that in the game.

    ...

    Your notes about Infinite mode are very interesting, and ultimately leaves it as ambiguous how it's intended to be used... I feel like I need to contemplate this, lol. How is it intended, in different chess games.

    However, I think the initial answer is that Infinite is meant to be played, in those games that it's playable. (GG Chessmaster, etc.) But this still leaves the big question of what's the purpose of Infinite in MS "Sega Chess," since it's not actually playable? Hmm...

    --

    Re: GG Chessmaster glitching out, after being left on for like 20 hours:

    Well, I might have to think about this some more, but in the past, I wasn't considering it a problem, because it just seemed obvious that the game, and the Game Gear itself, was never meant to be left running for 20+ hours, in the first place lol.

    And I also didn't think it would be glitching that other people would see, unless they were being crazy like me, and leaving their Game Gear on, plugged into a wall, for days at a time.

    Also, I didn't think the glitching was related to Infinite mode, or related to difficulty setting, in any way. Hmm, but maybe it is, lol. As Infinite would have the most thinking being done by the game, so maybe that would eventually lead the game to break, more than the lesser difficulty settings? Anything's possible, I guess.

    I had been just thinking of it as total time elapsed, causing glitching eventually...

    Also maybe I had underestimated that other people would like to leave the game on for days, like I used to? It is a nice idea to have this little chess game on your desk all the time, for example.

  9. #24
    Hedgehog-in-Training Hedgehog-in-TrainingNameless One Aleste's Avatar
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    Although hardly an ideal set-up, I did some testing via emulators. It's obviously not reliable in regards to engine performance, however I did have a match against lvl13 GBC Chessmaster, Deep Think on, and SMS Grand Chess Master. None of my old emulators have anything fancy like frame speedups or similar, so the whole thing took all day... Of course I wasn't always there to pass the move each other.
    I regret not writing down the match, but since supposedly Chessmaster was the strongest engine I had it use Black pieces. It ended in a draw... I didn't wait for the technical of having the same board repeated for three times but it basically was a stall where the white, with its remaining tower and horse was able to prevent any escape of the king but wasn't able to put it in checkmate: it always had a square to move. And repeat...

    Time wise, they seemed comparabile. Chessmaster on an average a little faster than Sega.

    Now let's put engine performance aside for a moment and let's get back to presentation. To better judge this aspect I also ran NES Chessmaster, the Snes one, and the russian Genesis unlicensed "Chess" (BS Comp). I'm writing just for the sake of discussion, I'm locked inside home due to COVID so it's nice that this thread sparked enough interest so far. Besides, the outcome on presentation is less straightforward as one might think...

    Although there a critical differences, no set-up is flawless.
    Let's begin with the supposedly best / most advanced one, the 16bit Snes Chessmaster. It's a software that is sold purely on the basis of its engine' strength. As a package for console gamers, it falls flat. The presentation here received the bare minimum of necessities: you can't alter board colors or pieces shapes, but are given only a fantasy set as alternative (not usable in war room view). The game offers a grand total of *one* BGM which is hilariously out of context, if listening is even a good idea during chess... Even Tetris and Columns had the decency to offer at least three or four tunes to choose from.

    The 3D view is quite well done and surprisingly lets you to arrange the board to start with your pieces from each of the four sides, and you can switch always during play. That's some nice 3D, or so you think at first glance until you realize that despite the slant board, all pieces are of the same size, greatly reducing any illusion of depth... Incidentally, BSComp does exactly the same. Stylistically, the Staunton set is quite well done, if a bit on the chubby size, and reminiscent of the Amiga 1986 landmark beginning. The fantasy set also boasts good spritework, although you feel shortchanged because with such graphics you'd expect them to go the extra mile and offer battle animations a la Battle Chess or Archon.

    Still, of course after a while 3D gets in the way and you'll revert to 2D mode, which is offered in two styles, plain 2D and "War Room" which shrinks the board to offer lots of info on the sides. Plain 2D only has clock and (optional) coordinates as cluttered. WR has: notations for the last 4 moves, hints for both sides, visual list of captured pieces, and "ply" and "MV" which are to measure how far the computer is anticipating the moves. It quickly becomes clear that WR gives you the most instruments to play well, at the expense of chessboard size.

    However, I noticed that all three modes present a crucial flaw that NES, Gameboy, Game Gear and GBC thankfully avoid: the "hand" cursor stays always the same, so if you're leaving to attend other needs, there's no way to visually understand who's turn is it once you get back to the monitor. In all the others, the cursor becomes a light bulb while computer is thinking, giving you instantly a visual cue if you have to move or wait for the other. Here, your only option is to see notations in WR. Lame.

    To end with Snes Chessmaster, it must be noted that not only it missed its chance to really stand out visually (I'm thinking Activision's Shanghai III on Genesis for example), but it is also incredibly sparse with campioned audio samples. Every move has a sound cue, not even special cases like "check" are spelled. Underwhelming. Snes Chessmaster didn't exactly get stellar reviews back then: it is obvious that even console players were expecting something more from the package, maybe they had been spoiled by the sensational NES prequel.

    The NES in fact has most things we analyzed on Snes, including the useful war room view. It even has a way more classy entry tune, Dave Brubeck in square audio waves. Hats off to that. Of course, the NES is lacking any 3D view or alternating set pieces...

    In light of this, it must be said Sega Chess puts up a good show: not only is the only 8-bit among those considered to offer a 3D view, which you can flip although just in the 2 main perspectives unlike the four seen in the Snes: but it also offer a good range of optional digitized speech.

    It's true: as Ecco pointed out in his review, the 2D view is not a war room, lacking captures and hints. It does, however, feature a much larger chessboard than the one in the WR. I feel that criticism of the visual aspect of the icons on the right portion of the screen is too harsh in the review, especially in light of the fact that each icon has its corresponding text description on the bottom screen, so there's never the "what the heck will this button do?" sensation that sadly plagues too many games (Syndicate? World Cup USA '94?!).

    And I fail to see what's wrong with the 3D offering of this chessboard; the icons at the bottom take arguably less volume than those on the right in 2D mode: and the tilted perspective is spot on, offering something visually quite polished, I'd say the best among these games due to the pieces that get larger and smaller, following perspective. Another nice touch of this 3D presentation is that whenever your cursor is on a piece, that piece will appear on the side of the board: this way one can play the cluttered 3D view with the certainty to always pick up the piece he intends to move.
    Speaking of controls, i must say I found the "grid system" of the game much more joypad friendly than the one in Chessmaster where you have a floaty full control of your hand, unnecessarily ending in way too many "this is not a legal action" warnings. It is most likely a remain of a mouse-intended control scheme. Here, your cursor is either in one spot or in another: no gray zones of sorts.
    All in all, I'd say the presentation here is the most convincing, which is something I truly didn't expect given the competition.

    Sega Chess gains point in the option menu as well: hidden there you'll find, amazingly, the full notation of the match. Not just the last four moves as in the war room, but the full transcript. It's too good to be true so I suspect It'll have a hard limit cap, but it registered some sixty moves last evening, which I thought wasn't half bad. As Ecco noticed, entering the option menu may have the unwanted side effect to force the opponent's move: just enter the option during your turn and you'll avoid this problem entirely.

    Finally, I'd spend two words on the portable Chessmasters: they lack any fancy 3D and even WR of course. Considering the huge gain in portable factor, this is completely understandable. The GBC one comes quite late to the party, and brings on the table some different tilesets for pieces and boards in a variety of colors. Other than that, it doesn't seem to be such a leap from the GG one of almost a decade prior. It only rests to see if the engine inside has been updated in gameplay terms.
    Last edited by Aleste; 03-31-2020 at 10:53 PM.

  10. #25
    Raging in the Streets goldenband's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aleste View Post
    It ended in a draw... I didn't wait for the technical of having the same board repeated for three times but it basically was a stall where the white, with its remaining tower and horse was able to prevent any escape of the king but wasn't able to put it in checkmate: it always had a square to move. And repeat...
    Interesting -- did Sega Chess have a knight and rook (and king) against a lone king for Chessmaster? If so, that should be a quick win, and it'd be very weird if it couldn't find the checkmate.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aleste View Post
    The NES in fact has most things we analyzed on Snes, including the useful war room view. It even has a way more classy entry tune, Dave Brubeck in square audio waves. Hats off to that.
    Agreed, and a nice catch. I wonder if they paid him for it?

    Quote Originally Posted by Aleste View Post
    each icon has its corresponding text description on the bottom screen, so there's never the "what the heck will this button do?" sensation that sadly plagues too many games
    Agreed again. The worst offender in this regard I've seen is Overlord for NES -- I've beaten that game 3-4 times, and every time I forget how the UI works and have to relearn it.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aleste View Post
    Sega Chess gains point in the option menu as well: hidden there you'll find, amazingly, the full notation of the match. Not just the last four moves as in the war room, but the full transcript. It's too good to be true so I suspect It'll have a hard limit cap, but it registered some sixty moves last evening, which I thought wasn't half bad.
    Yes, I noticed that too, and appreciated it. The notation scheme it uses isn't ideal, but it has the huge advantage of being country-agnostic, since France, Spain, Germany, etc. all use different names for the pieces. If it can store at least 128 moves (that'd be my guess for a hard limit), it should cover almost every realistic gameplay situation except for the most epic of endgame grinds.

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    Hedgehog-in-Training Hedgehog-in-TrainingNameless One Aleste's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldenband View Post
    Interesting -- did Sega Chess have a knight and rook (and king) against a lone king for Chessmaster? If so, that should be a quick win, and it'd be very weird if it couldn't find the checkmate.
    No sorry, I haven't thought of doing a pic of the late game but both sides had a horse and a rook, and pawn parity... So I presume whenever the Sega king wasn't in check, the oppositor could have sooner or later do a different move. I regret not having the patience to see that out the end.

    In the meantime however, I tried something with better hardware: a match between the Snes Chessmaster and Sega Chess. Unlike the previous match, at least this time 50% of the hardware was real: I played an SMS emulator against my actual snes and cartridge. Since I assume Chessmaster to be strongest, he took black, and despite this it won. the match lasted 52 moves, and this time I saved the full notations. I'm so clumsy that I didn't figure out how to change them in a FEN string for caissa.

    Here are a couple of snapshot from the match:



    Here you can see a possible use for the option of flipping the 3D chessboard. The 3D view of Snes has the clock mandatory; however, it resets every hour, something that will interest Ecco: the Sega clock of nine hours was barely good to contain the match.



    And here's the checkmate. I leave to the resident experts to judge if SMS did pose a challenge and to what extent. Chessmaster was playing lvl13 and Sega Grand Master. No takebacks, and never forcing to move.



    And here's a collage of all the notation strings. Interestingly, they work on Sega as a time machine: if you want to replay the match, let's say from the eleventh move, you can jump directly to it, instead of rewinding all the moves one by one.

    https://www.sega-16.com/forum/attach...4&d=1585864503

    Sorry the image uploader did made this last image pretty useless by downsampling it. I will manually transcribe the notations:

    001 C2-C4 C7-C5
    002 B1-C3 G8-F6
    003 G1-F3 B8-C6
    004 D2D3 E7-E5
    005 E2-E4 F8-E7
    006 F1-E2 0-0
    007 0-0 D7-D6
    008 D1-B3 C6-D4
    009 F3*D4 C5*D4
    010 C3-D5 F6*D5
    011 C4*D5 D8-A5
    012 F1-D1 A5-D8
    013 C1-D2 E7-G5
    014 A1-C1 G5*D2
    015 D1*D2 F7-F6
    016 D2-C2 F8-F7
    017 E2-H5 G7-G6
    018 H5-F3 B7-B6
    019 B3-B4 C8-B7
    020 F3-G4 A7-A5
    021 B4-D2 F6-F5
    022 G4-F3 A8-C8
    023 C2*C8 B7*C8
    024 C1-C6 C8-B7
    025 C6-C4 F7-C7
    026 C4*C7 D8*C7
    027 E4*F5 G6*F5
    028 D2-G5+ G8-H8
    029 G5-F6+ H8-G8
    030 F6-H6 C7-E7
    031 H6-E6+ E7*E6
    032 D5*E6 B7*F3
    033 G2*F3 F5-F4
    034 B2-B4 A5*B4
    035 G1-G2 B6-B5
    036 G2-H3 G8-G7
    037 H3-G4 G7-F6
    038 G4-H5 F6*E6
    039 H5-H6 E6-F5
    040 H2-H4 D6-D5
    041 H6*H7 E5-E4
    042 F3*E4+ D5*E4
    043 D3*E4+ F5*E4
    044 H4-H5 D4-D3
    045 H7-G6 D3-D2
    046 H5-H6 D2-D1Q
    047 H6-H7 D1-A1
    048 G6-F7 A1-H8
    049 F7-G6 E4-E5
    050 G6-H6 E5-F5
    051 F2-F3 H8-F6+
    052 H6-H5 F6-G5+

    By the way, I noticed exactly the same weird behaviour you described when promoting the piece. Also, I was under the impression that you can choose what to promote to? They gave me Queen without asking me what I wanted...
    Last edited by Aleste; 04-02-2020 at 07:24 PM.

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