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Thread: The New York/PS5 is easy to get thread!

  1. #1
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    Sad The New York/PS5 is easy to get thread!

    Woke up and saw the news.
    It is terrible, I can't imagine how people will be dealing with all that flooding.
    Has the weather gone mad or some strange event in the atmosphere has triggered it?
    How is it that nobody saw that coming...?

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    Hero of Algol TrekkiesUnite118's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MegaDriver View Post
    Woke up and saw the news.
    It is terrible, I can't imagine how people will be dealing with all that flooding.
    Has the weather gone mad or some strange event in the atmosphere has triggered it?
    How is it that nobody saw that coming...?
    They got hit with the remnants of a Hurricane. We got some pretty bad flooding in PA from it as well. It's happened numerous times before in the past, and will continue to happen in the future when this kind of thing happens.

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    WCPO Agent Greg2600's Avatar
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    Irene, Sandy, now this one all in the last 10 years. Worst flooding I've seen around here since Floyd in 1999.

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    Hero of Algol TrekkiesUnite118's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg2600 View Post
    Irene, Sandy, now this one all in the last 10 years. Worst flooding I've seen around here since Floyd in 1999.
    You can honestly keep going back further. I know PA got hit pretty bad by Agnes back in the 70s.

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    End of line.. Hero of Algol gamevet's Avatar
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    Meanwhile, the West Coast is begging for a little more rain. Nevada had to shut down a reservoir, because of the water being too low for the dam to use.
    A Black Falcon: no, computer games and video games are NOT the same thing. Video games are on consoles, computer games are on PC. The two kinds of games are different, and have significantly different design styles, distribution methods, and game genre selections. Computer gaming and console (video) gaming are NOT the same thing."



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    Hedgehog-in-Training Hedgehog-in-TrainingRoad Rasher Prince Talmit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MegaDriver View Post
    some strange event in the atmosphere has triggered it?
    Yes. People have been releasing greenhouse gasses and increasing the energy in the atmosphere for many decades now.

    How is it that nobody saw that coming...?
    People have seen it coming. The warnings have been loud and clear throughout my lifetime. We've been warned about increasing intensity of storms and decreasing permeable surface areas.
    People are selfish, arrogant, and ignorant. They'd rather believe we are special and a magical sky daddy will protect them.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prince Talmit View Post
    Yes. People have been releasing greenhouse gasses and increasing the energy in the atmosphere for many decades now.
    The US has been pummeled by Hurricanes for centuries. We just pay more attention to it now thanks to the 24 hour News Cycle and entire television channels and websites dedicated to this kind of thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prince Talmit View Post
    People have seen it coming. The warnings have been loud and clear throughout my lifetime. We've been warned about increasing intensity of storms
    Ida was no more intense than previous hurricanes that have done similar damage to the northeast with flooding. It was a category 4 when it made landfall making it less intense than Katrina in 2005. But that really doesn't mean anything when it comes to flooding and tornadoes it's remnants will cause. Case in point, Hurricane Agnes back in 1972 was Category 1 Hurricane yet still holds the records for the amount of flooding and damage it caused in states like PA and New York.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prince Talmit View Post
    decreasing permeable surface areas.
    This one at least has some merit. Water has to go somewhere and when you get rid of swaths of farm land, forests, etc. that can have an impact. However with these kind of scenarios it's more that you get rivers overflowing which more permeable surface area isn't going to do much for that.

    Quote Originally Posted by Prince Talmit View Post
    People are selfish, arrogant, and ignorant. They'd rather believe we are special and a magical sky daddy will protect them.
    No, it's more that people with memories dating back further than the 90s realize we've had monster hurricanes for quite a while now.

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    8 & 16 bit guy Outrunner Bloodreign's Avatar
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    Ida's been a trouble maker wherever it's been. My home state was hit pretty hard Sunday and Monday by this storm (my area was spared), which was a Category 4 upon landfall. It has caused a fuel shortage in my area that will last awhile throughout the state, plus tons of damage. Another one of these is crossing the Atlantic as I type this, hopefully it curves out to sea and doesn't hit the Eat Coast as yet another monster storm.

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    Hedgehog-in-Training Hedgehog-in-TrainingRoad Rasher Prince Talmit's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrekkiesUnite118 View Post
    The US has been pummeled by Hurricanes for centuries. We just pay more attention to it now thanks to the 24 hour News Cycle and entire television channels and websites dedicated to this kind of thing.



    Ida was no more intense than previous hurricanes that have done similar damage to the northeast with flooding. It was a category 4 when it made landfall making it less intense than Katrina in 2005. But that really doesn't mean anything when it comes to flooding and tornadoes it's remnants will cause. Case in point, Hurricane Agnes back in 1972 was Category 1 Hurricane yet still holds the records for the amount of flooding and damage it caused in states like PA and New York.


    This one at least has some merit. Water has to go somewhere and when you get rid of swaths of farm land, forests, etc. that can have an impact. However with these kind of scenarios it's more that you get rivers overflowing which more permeable surface area isn't going to do much for that.



    No, it's more that people with memories dating back further than the 90s realize we've had monster hurricanes for quite a while now.
    Wow. There you have it folks. Nothing to worry about.

    you get rivers overflowing which more permeable surface area isn't going to do much for that.
    ...that takes the cake for sheer stupidity.

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    It's crazy how the northern states flooded this time compared to most of the southern ones. While some parishes here did flood a few feet, it wasn't quite to the extent that NY and the others got it. We didn't flood thankfully, but the ~150 mph winds did a lot of damage and was a terrifying experience. Never experienced a hurricane that bad before. It's gonna take time to get power restored and recover, and we're only at the start of hurricane season.

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    End of line.. Hero of Algol gamevet's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prince Talmit View Post
    Wow. There you have it folks. Nothing to worry about.


    ...that takes the cake for sheer stupidity.
    I think people need to realize that the history of this planet has been anything but calm. It had 2 Ice ages less than 30,000 years ago, Egypt was once a green oasis, and supposedly, someone mapped Antarctica when it wasn't covered in ice.

    All of this global warming, they say, is caused by green house gasses, but that sure as hell didn't keep us from freezing our asses off down here in Texas, when temperatures dropped below 20 degrees and the power grid failed. We have brutal winter storms every 7 years, because the Earth does not have a perfect orbit around the sun. I've seen enough of those brutal ice/snow storms over my lifetime, to be a true believer in the 7 year bad winter cycle.


    http://ossfoundation.us/projects/env...kovitch-cycles
    Last edited by gamevet; 09-04-2021 at 08:26 PM.
    A Black Falcon: no, computer games and video games are NOT the same thing. Video games are on consoles, computer games are on PC. The two kinds of games are different, and have significantly different design styles, distribution methods, and game genre selections. Computer gaming and console (video) gaming are NOT the same thing."



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by TrekkiesUnite118 View Post
    The US has been pummeled by Hurricanes for centuries. We just pay more attention to it now thanks to the 24 hour News Cycle and entire television channels and websites dedicated to this kind of thing.

    Ida was no more intense than previous hurricanes that have done similar damage to the northeast with flooding. It was a category 4 when it made landfall making it less intense than Katrina in 2005. But that really doesn't mean anything when it comes to flooding and tornadoes it's remnants will cause. Case in point, Hurricane Agnes back in 1972 was Category 1 Hurricane yet still holds the records for the amount of flooding and damage it caused in states like PA and New York.

    This one at least has some merit. Water has to go somewhere and when you get rid of swaths of farm land, forests, etc. that can have an impact. However with these kind of scenarios it's more that you get rivers overflowing which more permeable surface area isn't going to do much for that.

    No, it's more that people with memories dating back further than the 90s realize we've had monster hurricanes for quite a while now.
    Yes there have been intense storms centuries ago. However, we've been hit with them time after time. It's the rate and intensity of the storms, fueled by warming ocean temperatures, that is the concern. And no, it's not due to a 24 hour news cycle. It's a matter of living through them time after time. I can tell you in my area, there were big floods back in the Depression, but there were hardly any development then nor much of a storm drainage system. The infrastructure is tapped out, it cannot handle the intense rain we got last week on one night. So the solution has to include infrastructure improvements, but it cannot just be that. The money being spent on recovery from extreme weather will continue to dwarf what we could spend on improving our energy systems.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Greg2600 View Post
    The money being spent on recovery from extreme weather will continue to dwarf what we could spend on improving our energy systems.
    That's because money makes the world go round. When there's a catastrophe, there's large amounts of funds made available for recovery, and if there's funding available, there's profit to be made. Infrastructural improvements and accident preventions not only get less funding in general, but it cuts in to the profit to be made from the recovery efforts.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Prince Talmit View Post
    ...that takes the cake for sheer stupidity.
    Please explain to me how more permeable surface area is going to do jack shit when the River is overflowing? Do you think the water that goes into the ground just goes into the dirt and stays there? It doesn't. Ground water eventually makes it's way back to the surface and eventually into rivers, streams, and other bodies of water. So when you get this kind of intense, sustained, heavy rain fall even with more permeable surface area that water is still eventually going to make its way into the river causing the river to overflow, as well as leading to dams and reservoirs becoming overburdened.

    This kind of thing happens regularly in my area because it consists of multiple river valleys. It's been a fact of life for a very VERY long time in this area long before urbanization even began. Hell I'd consider myself lucky in that most of where I live still has tons of farm land and non-urbanized areas. Yet those rural areas get flooded just as bad if not worse than the urban areas in these situations.

    It's simply what happens when you settle in a flood plane or in an area close to or lower than sea-level.

    Quote Originally Posted by Greg2600 View Post
    Yes there have been intense storms centuries ago. However, we've been hit with them time after time. It's the rate and intensity of the storms, fueled by warming ocean temperatures, that is the concern. And no, it's not due to a 24 hour news cycle. It's a matter of living through them time after time. I can tell you in my area, there were big floods back in the Depression, but there were hardly any development then nor much of a storm drainage system. The infrastructure is tapped out, it cannot handle the intense rain we got last week on one night. So the solution has to include infrastructure improvements, but it cannot just be that. The money being spent on recovery from extreme weather will continue to dwarf what we could spend on improving our energy systems.
    Has the rate really increased? That's really the problem with this argument. Storms have only really been tracked this intensely for maybe the past 50 years? Prior that it's spotty at best and we just don't have any good data. And again, we're not really seeing anything more intense than what we've seen before. Sure the costs for recovery might be going up, but that's going to increase as the population in these areas increases resulting in more damage. Then there's the fact you also need to factor in inflation. If you actually look at the measured intensity and category of the storms though that's all over the place. Sure we've had some intense ones in the past 30 years, but some of the most intense ones date back the early 1900s or even the 1800s. We've just started tracking them and paying more attention to them in the last 50 years or so thanks to the fact we now have Weather Satellites and Radar to help track them.

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    Master of Shinobi JCU's Avatar
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    The five boroughs, L.I., etc.., get hit and deal with storms but that's what happens when you are an island sticking out into the Atlantic.

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