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Thread: Sports Talk Baseball

  1. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Baloo View Post

    And that voice is just dynamite. Reminds me of the late Harry Kalas. I wonder who does that voice?
    According to Wikipedia (So, natural grain of salt required):

    Quote Originally Posted by Wiki
    Sega contracted sports announcer Lon Simmons as well as the vocal reproduction company Electronic Speech Systems to record the unique phrases and play calls for the game.
    And, yes, this is an excellent baseball game. I picked it up really cheap, and am very happy with it. Both this and the final Sports Talk Football games (NFL 94 and College Football's National Championship) are superb.

  2. #17

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    NFL 94 rocks^^
    i played it when i was a lil' boy...
    i'm gonna search for it

  3. #18
    Sports Talker A2600's Avatar
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    I dont know about you guys but I can swear that Jose Canseco is the one on the cover/cart art.

  4. #19
    Road Rasher EddieJ1984's Avatar
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    I do love this game, for a bit I thought it was just good, then I realized how to put AUTO fielding on, and it makes the game great!
    Hell its so great Ive had the cart for a couple of years now the other month in the thrift store I saw it in a case and instruction manual! I had to buy it again! And im certainly not one of the cib collectors.

  5. #20
    ICE HOCKEY BY ACTIVISION! The Sports Guy's Avatar
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    Yeah, the manual fielding certainly is an acquired taste. I don't play auto anymore, but i did for a long, long time.
    Sega-16's Resident Sports Authority. Chief Heckler of the Midwest.

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  6. #21
    Road Rasher EddieJ1984's Avatar
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    God damn, I just played a game, was the phillies vs the pirates.
    Im losin 1-4, bottom of the 9th and the game freezes, I so woulda came back lol at least that's what I tell myself.

  7. #22
    The Gentleman Thief Baloo's Avatar
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    This is usually what I hear while playing Sports Talk Baseball:

    FASTBALL! Swing and a Miss.
    FASTBALL! Swing and a Miss.
    FASTBALL! And the batter goes down on strikes!
    Quote Originally Posted by j_factor View Post
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  8. #23
    Raging in the Streets Aarzak's Avatar
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    I can't bay-lieve it!

  9. #24
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    the announcer of this game is defienetely lon simmons and I used to love this game, I have to play this again

  10. #25
    WCPO Agent Tripredacus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by A2600 View Post
    I dont know about you guys but I can swear that Jose Canseco is the one on the cover/cart art.
    Definately isn't. I'm fairly certain it isn't an A's player. You can tell because while they did photoshop the helmet color, they left the jersey pretty much alone. You can see a guy in the dugout has either an Orioles or Angels hat. Either way, unless this photo was taken at the All-Star Game, the batter is playing for an American League team since there was no interleague play in 1991-2. Since it has stripes, we can drill down to either the Yankees or White Sox. Next we can see that he is white, no facial hair, not wearing glasses and a left handed batter. Also important to look at the cleats. So to my list of possible players...

    White Sox- Robin Ventura, Mike Huff
    Yankees - Kevin Maas

  11. #26
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    I heard a lot about this game and its more arcadey feel when compared to the World Series Baseball series of games. Having finally picked this game up, I... well, I don't see the appeal of it at all. The batting seems to be nonsensical. No matter what part of the bat I hit the ball with, or where my batter is standing, the ball goes to the second baseman or the shortstop about 75-80% of the time (yes, I did the math). The rest is the occasional random base hit or home run. Meanwhile, the CPU team hits it to where no one is standing about 70% of the time, while my outfielders are running AWAY from the ball. Diving for balls that are close by seems sporadic at best, and I lose games due to the domination rule before the third inning comes to pass most of the time. The CPU seems to hit just about anything I throw, and I've yet to figure out when the best time to try and swing is (watching the ball or its shadow has done me no favors). I swear, I've had fairer games playing Hardball! on my old Atari XEGS.

    The part that annoys me the most about STB, is that I can play World Series Baseball just fine. I hold my own well when it comes to batting, pitching and fielding. But Sports Talk Baseball? Nope. The voice is cool, as is being able to move the batter around and having a stamina meter for pitching. But the first World Series Baseball featured a fair bit of the same play calling and it played far, far better IMO.

    If I'm missing something when it comes to the batting and the fielding in STB, please explain it to me. I've read so many reviews about this game, with people gushing about how great and fun it is. I'd like to see the appeal of, and have fun with, Sports Talk Baseball too. But right now, I simply don't and can't


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  12. #27
    Raging in the Streets goldenband's Avatar
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    Haven't played Sports Talk Baseball myself, but there's some interesting discussion here:

    http://www.sega-16.com/forum/showthr...ame-on-Genesis

    In particular, Night Driver -- who's got a pretty good handle on Genesis baseball games -- had this to say:

    Quote Originally Posted by Night Driver View Post
    I would place it in the top half of Genesis baseball games, but it's not the best baseball game on the Genesis. Although I would say that its defensive gameplay is perhaps the best I've encountered. The game is also stat-based, which is always good.

    The shame of the game is that pitching (and hitting to a large extent) is just a formality. It really doesn't matter how you pitch or what pitches you throw; none of that has any influence on the kind of hits the CPU gets. Seriously, you can just throw pitches right down the center of the plate and the CPU is as likely to ground out to the pitcher as it is to hit a homerun.
    Night Driver cites the World Series Baseball series as superior. I haven't really played those either; I've spent most of my 16-bit baseball time on the HardBall and RBI Baseball series.

  13. #28

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    I don't think the pitching is horrible in Sports Talk. I can at least get through half a game without worrying about pitching. Very easy to tag runners who try to go for 3rd base every time. I personally think the fielding is garbage. Very slow players and the animations are stiff.

    This game and Tommy Lasorda are overrated by many. Not horrible, but not spectacular. Sega was better with their Game Gear baseball games. Arcadey games done right on their handheld. The Majors Pro Baseball was way better than their pre-World Series Genesis efforts.
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  14. #29
    Road Rasher Night Driver's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by goldenband View Post
    In particular, Night Driver -- who's got a pretty good handle on Genesis baseball games -- had this to say:

    Quote Originally Posted by Night Driver View Post
    I would place it in the top half of Genesis baseball games, but it's not the best baseball game on the Genesis. Although I would say that its defensive gameplay is perhaps the best I've encountered. The game is also stat-based, which is always good.

    The shame of the game is that pitching (and hitting to a large extent) is just a formality. It really doesn't matter how you pitch or what pitches you throw; none of that has any influence on the kind of hits the CPU gets. Seriously, you can just throw pitches right down the center of the plate and the CPU is as likely to ground out to the pitcher as it is to hit a homerun.
    Night Driver cites the World Series Baseball series as superior.
    Like Coop's above, my initial impressions of this game when I first played it (for the beat-'em-all effort, years ago) were not favorable, especially in regards to the seemingly random nature of pitching/hitting in the game. However, my opinions have evolved over the intervening years and I now consider Sports Talk Baseball (STB) to be one of the better baseball titles of the 16-bit era. Having now played through the majority of 16-bit baseball titles, I can tell you that all of them have their fair share of flaws. STB's flaws are neither unique or rare.

    When it comes to 16-bit sports games, the perspective that I hold now is that it's more productive to focus on what a game does well, rather than on what it does poorly.

    STB does a number of things well. Pace-of-play is outstanding. Presentation is top notch—the voice of the play-by-play announcer may lag in places, but it's surprisingly well-integrated into the action on the field and able to react to many different types of plays. Controls are crisp and responsive. Defensive gameplay is satisfying. The statistical parameters of the game translate directly to player performance on the field, which creates opportunities for deep, strategic gameplay. And, finally, the game strikes a good balance between hitting-for-average and hitting-for-power, which is something the majority of 16-bit baseball games really struggle with.

    I have even softened my criticisms of pitching/hitting in the game. I can see now that these aspects of the game aren't so much "random" as they are "probabilistic". And probabilistic I'm OK with.

    Anyway, I've been spending some time with the game recently, trying to deconstruct its underlying statistical framework in an attempt to better understand the capabilities and predict the performances of individual players on the field. While searching the web for more in-depth information on the game, I stumbled on to the game's Wikipedia page where I discovered this little nugget:

    Quote Originally Posted by Wikipedia
    The most valuable (hitting) player in the game is Howard Johnson of the New York Mets. HoJo has the full capability in both running and hitting. He also has the ability to play infield and outfield.
    This is incorrect. I don't mean to quibble because Howard Johnson is, indeed, one of the best offensive players in the game, certainly in the top-10 in that sense, but he is not *THE* best offensive player in the game, and certainly not the best overall player in the game. It's true that his power and speed are both rated 4-out-of-4, but his batting average is a middling .259. And by "middling", I mean "exactly middling", as in the mean batting average of all 318 non-pitchers in the game is .259 (yes, like Coop above, I did the math). This mediocre batting average is what limits Johnson's potential and prevents him from being considered as the best offensive player in the game.

    Batting average is the most important offensive statistic in STB, as it determines the probability that a batter will make solid contact with the ball, resulting in a hit. It seems that a player's power rating subsequently determines whether that hit will be for extra-bases or, possibly, a home run. One can easily see that the more opportunities a player has to make solid contact with the ball (as determined by his BA), the more opportunities he creates for his power rating to subsequently influence that hit and potentially turn it into a hit for extra bases.

    It's Johnson's 4-out-of-4 speed that is really the vital component of his total offensive potential. I don't think I have to explain the value of base stealing, stretching a single into a double, scoring from 2nd on a base-hit RBI, or beating out the throw and reaching 1st base after hitting a weak infield dribbler right to the 3rd baseman.

    There are only 3 players in the game with 4-out-of-4 ratings in both speed and power. They are New York's (National League) Howard Johnson, Atlanta's Ron Gant, and Pittsburgh's Barry Bonds. In terms of pure offensive potential, each of these players are top-10 in the game.

    According to my calculations, that top-10 is as follows.

    1. Julio Franco (Texas). 3/4 power, 4/4 speed, backed by a gaudy .341 BA.
    2. Barry Bonds (Pittsburgh). Dual 4/4's wedded to an excellent .292 BA.
    3. Ruben Sierra (Texas). 4/4 power, 3/4 speed, outstanding .307 BA.
    4. Ivan Calderon (Montreal). 3/4 power, 4/4 speed, outstanding .300 BA.
    5. Howard Johnson (New York-National). Twin 4/4's, but held back by a middling .259 BA.
    6. Ryne Sandberg (Chicago-National). 4/4 power, 3/4 speed combined with an excellent .295 BA.
    7. Ron Gant (Atlanta). A double 4/4 guy, but hobbled by a middling .251 BA.
    8. Devon White (Toronto). 3/4 power, 4/4 speed, with a respectable .282 BA.
    9. Ken Griffey Jr. (Seattle). 3/4 rankings in both power and speed, but elite .327 BA
    10. Paul Molitor (Milwaukee). 3/4 in both power and speed, coupled with a .325 BA.

    Of course, offensive potential isn't the only measure of a player's value. In STB, defense capability is as important, if not more important, than offensive potential.

    Figuring in each player's defensive capabilities, the overall top-10 best players in the game, according to my calculations, are as follows.

    1. Barry Bonds (Pittsburgh)
    2. Cal Ripken Jr. (Baltimore)
    3. Ryne Sandberg (Chicago-National)
    4. Devon White (Toronto)
    5. Ken Griffey Jr. (Seattle)
    6. Joe Carter (Toronto)
    7. Wille McGee (San Francisco)
    8. Roberto Kelly (New York-American)
    9. Daryl Strawberry (Los Angeles)
    10. Steve Sax (Chicago-American)
    Last edited by Night Driver; 05-29-2020 at 07:43 PM.

  15. #30
    counter of beans Hedgehog-in-TrainingWildside Expert Cafeman's Avatar
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    Pittsburgh. One of the few burgs with an H. But seriously ... I can't fathom how you could know that much about STB! Appreciated the details and analysis.

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