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Thread: Art of Fighting

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    Blast processor Melf's Avatar
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    Blinky Art of Fighting

    Not to be outdone by rival Capcom, SNK released a bazillion fighting series on every platform short of the pocket calculator (though I'm sure it's probably out there). Among they plethora of brawling goodness unleashed up on button mashers everywhere was the Art of Fighting series, known for its massive sprites and nausea-inducing zoom effect. The game was eventually reprogrammed by Sega and released on the Genesis, and the sprites and zoom were only two things missing that had made the coin-op so popular. Read all about how watered down it became in our full review.

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    Elemental Master WCPO Agent GameUser-16-32-128's Avatar
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    I remember owning this game way back then. The difficulty was high and the controls sucked! It was so hard just trying to pull off a simple fireball (Then again, the original arcade version was tough)! I did eventually beat it and it's really not worth the trouble. This game is better on the Neo-Geo, emulated on MAME or on the Dreamcast.

    And if you haven't guessed it ....










    SPOILER! SPOILER! SPOILER!


























































    Mr. Karate is Takuma Sakazaki! Ryo and Yuri's Father! OMG!

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    Raging in the Streets Aarzak's Avatar
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    As was the practice of Sega of America at the time, the U.S version of "Art of Fighting" was made much more difficult by limiting the number of continues to 3 (the Japanese version had UNLIMITED continues) and offering only two difficulty levels, "Normal" and "Hard" (the Japanese version had several, from Easy to Normal to Hard). I bet those two that they're offering are more difficult than any of the Japanese version's difficulty levels, as was the case with "Streets of Rage 3".


    Apart from that, this is a competent port of the Neo-Geo original. No one, even back then in the early '90's, expected the Genesis to replicate the scaling (which, as Milf said, was nausea-inducing, yet was later perfected in "Samurai Shodown"). The Genny port however, is unique for having line-scrolling floors and parallax in its backgrounds, which no other version, including the original Neo-Geo, have. Unfortunately, the original sound/voice samples have been RAPED after being run through the Genny's sound hardware, and rival SF2:SCE's in scratchiness. I however, like the Genny's rendition of the original Neo soundtrack, and even prefer some of its compositions to the Neo's. Some are worse of course. But it was a unique take on the original soundtrack and suited the Genny's sound hardware nicely.

    Genesis AoF is also missing Ryo/Robert's "Desperation Move", the Ryuuko Ranbu (first-ever "Super Move" in a fighting game). Not too much of a loss, considering it was a ***** to perform in the original anyways.

    It was a decent port of a decent-at-best game, and one of the better Neo-to-Genesis ports. Amongst AoF ports however, it is the worst. Just get "Art of Fighting Anthology" for PS2 (which should be at $10 or less NEW by now) if you want the definitive version of anything AoF.

    TRIVIA: "Art of Fighting" was one of the first-ever Genesis games to be released in cardboard packaging. It was released sometime around August/September 1994 according to reviews, before "Sonic & Knuckles"'s October 1994 release, with the latter being the first noteworthy Genesis game to be released in cardboard.

    CRV, if you're lurking around, any idea who was behind this and other Neo-to-Genesis ports? I'm surprised that Sega supposedly tackled this one themselves.

    This has been another Aarzak mini-review.
    Last edited by Aarzak; 07-28-2009 at 12:33 AM.

  4. #4
    Death Adder's minion
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    I didn't really agree with this review as an owner of both the original arcade version and the port.

    While not perfect, it was the best port you could hope for on the Genny.

    I didn't really buy you bitching about the controls either...sounds exactly like the arcade setup to me. Also, taunting is a factor in fights given how it drains your opponent's move gauge so I can see why they'd focus on that for the extra buttons. Would it have been easier if Sega had put hard kick and hard punch onto a separate button? Of course. Would it have been authentic to the arcade? Absolutely not.

    The scaling's gone but the characters are still huge and represent the arcade sprites well.

    I always thought this was one of the better NeoGeo console ports, especially for the Genesis.

    ...any idea who was behind this and other Neo-to-Genesis ports? I'm surprised that Sega supposedly tackled this one themselves.
    Takara handled all of the other Genesis/Sega CD ports, although I can't remember if they did World Heroes or not.

  5. #5
    Raging in the Streets Aarzak's Avatar
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    Well, I meant that, even though some of these Neo ports were listed as being published/developed by Takara, they may have been sub-contracted to another developer who ported the game(s) uncredited. Genesis "World Heroes" was handled by the obscure, short-lived "Sega Midwest" studio and released in the summer of 1994. Lots of Neo stuff was released for the Genny that summer......Fatal Fury 2, King of the Monsters 2, World Heroes, AoF. Back to WH, it is by far the worst port of a Neo fighting game to the Genesis. And the original WH was mediocre to begin with. They completely destroyed the original's gameplay, The sfx/voice have been raped as well. The music's decent, but completely out of order compared to the arcade/SNES, and a lot of the BGM's were left on the cutting room floor, leaving only a few themes being cycled over and over.

    Our own CRV, of GDRI, has expanded a lot on this in the past.

    I'm an avid player of AoF1, and still pop it in (or rather, load it up LOL get it) from time to time. Its the only one in the series I can stand to play; AoF2's A.I is infamously cheap, and AoF3 is just.........lame.

    AoF2 2-player>>>>>>>>AoF1>>>>>>>>>>AoF2 1-player>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>AoF3.

    And yes, taunting is very important to the game.

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    Road Rasher CRV's Avatar
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    Just found the credits. Looks like SNK did it.

    Other Neo conversions:
    Fatal Fury = Company that also worked on GB conversions and the GEN/MD version of Virtua Fighter 2. Sound by Aspect.
    Fatal Fury 2 = Company that also worked on GB conversions and the GEN/MD version of Virtua Fighter 2. Sound by Aspect.
    Fatal Fury Special (CD) = Funcom
    King of the Monsters = SPS
    King of the Monsters 2 = Betop. Sound by T's Music?
    Samurai Shodown = System Vision
    Samurai Shodown (CD) = Funcom
    Sengoku Denshou (CD) = "GDRI-004," as we call them. Also did Caliber .50, Chiki Chiki Boys, Wardner, etc.
    World Heroes = Sega Midwest

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    Raging in the Streets Aarzak's Avatar
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    A port done by SNK themselves? Woah. Now that I think about it, I found it odd that the Genesis port retained the SNK logo on its title screen........the ONLY 16-Bit port of a Neo game I've seen that has done so. Not sure if this means anything..........didn't the Genesis port just copypasta the original Neo credits in its ending sequence, without mentioning anybody who worked on the actual port?

    About Genesis Samurai Shodown, the title screen says it was (partially?) reprogrammed by Saurus. In the JPN version (published by Sega), there's a dual reprogramming credit of Sega/Saurus. In the U.S version, its Takara/Saurus. Do you know anything of this company? I know they ported Art of Fighting 2 (JPN only) to the SFC, and made a couple of Neo games as well.
    Last edited by Aarzak; 07-28-2009 at 06:16 AM.

  8. #8
    Road Rasher CRV's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aarzak View Post
    A port done by SNK themselves? Woah. Now that I think about it, I found it odd that the Genesis port retained the SNK logo on its title screen........the ONLY 16-Bit port of a Neo game I've seen that has done so. Not sure if this means anything..........didn't the Genesis port just copypasta the original Neo credits in its ending sequence, without mentioning anybody who worked on the actual port?
    No, they're different. They do share a programmer, though.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aarzak View Post
    About Genesis Samurai Shodown, the title screen says it was (partially?) reprogrammed by Saurus. In the JPN version (published by Sega), there's a dual reprogramming credit of Sega/Saurus. In the U.S version, its Takara/Saurus. Do you know anything of this company? I know they ported Art of Fighting 2 (JPN only) to the SFC, and made a couple of Neo games as well.
    Saurus did a bunch of stuff for SNK. According to this, it was a development subsidiary that was dissolved when SNK was being reorganized in 2000. System Vision did a couple Neo games for Saurus, Ragnagard and Stakes Winner II.

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    Nameless One McTom's Avatar
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    I am not sure, but wasn't there also a movie called "Art of Fighting"? (I mean, the guy on the box really looks like Steven Seagal....)

    If yes, how does this game relate to it?

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    Quote Originally Posted by McTom View Post
    I am not sure, but wasn't there also a movie called "Art of Fighting"? (I mean, the guy on the box really looks like Steven Seagal....)

    If yes, how does this game relate to it?
    The game doesn't relate to it, it's just a Street Fighter knock-off produced by SNK, which evolved into the King of Fighters series of games.
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    The Rhythm Rogue Outrunner cj iwakura's Avatar
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    Also, Dan in Street Fighter Alpha was a knock-off of Ryo from Art of Fighting as their response, if I remember right.

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    monsters of rock acdc's Avatar
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    i still like to plat this game from time to time
    but part 2 on the neo geo damn the diffuculty but i still love it
    and part 3 was really messed up

    what i also liked about the game is that you can see the damage on the charaters faces nice touch

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aarzak View Post
    As was the practice of Sega of America at the time, the U.S version of "Art of Fighting" was made much more difficult by limiting the number of continues to 3 (
    Should be noted that the US version was apparently polished up from the PAL version (unsure of actual release dates) since many of the typos in the story mode have been remedied.

    Also, only the US version features the awesome scrolls of the billowing smoke in Mickey's stage. The JP/PAL versions have a static BG.

    Apparently this was originally ported by SOJ and SOA handled the World Heroes atrocity.

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    Now with 33% more @$$! Master of Shinobi Assman's Avatar
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    Did no one realize that you could change the 6-button configuration in the options menu to follow the more familiar layout (X and A for light attacks, Y and B for heavy)?

    Yeah, I know this was necrobumped and all, I just figured someone would have noted that.

  15. #15
    Raging in the Streets Aarzak's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azathoth View Post
    Should be noted that the US version was apparently polished up from the PAL version (unsure of actual release dates) since many of the typos in the story mode have been remedied.

    Also, only the US version features the awesome scrolls of the billowing smoke in Mickey's stage. The JP/PAL versions have a static BG.

    Apparently this was originally ported by SOJ and SOA handled the World Heroes atrocity.
    According to fellow member CRV of GDRI, AoF may have been ported by SNK themselves, or at least had SNK personnel involved in the port. It's the only 16-Bit port of a Neo-Geo game with an SNK logo on the title screen.......okay now I'm just speculating. Most likely it was handled in-house over at SoJ. The defunct, obscure "Sega Midwest" division of SOA handled the atrocious WH port. CRV had a candid interview with the sole person responsible for most of that port a year or two ago.......he really had little resources to work with. (Picked up porting duties from someone else, had to start over from scratch, no source code)

    Both ports came out in mid-to-late summer 1994 (WH was only released in the U.S and Asia) and, unsurprinsingly went unnoticed, as they were gimped ports of almost two-year old games that weren't much good to begin with. AoF was one of the first Genny games to be released in the now-dreaded cardboard packaging, and took quite a while to get here from Japan (where it was released in January 1994). WH, coming out a little earlier came in clamshell packaging.

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