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Ones That Got Away: 32X Games

Ones That Got Away: 32X Games

Many people defend the 32X as a decent piece of hardware. Many others bash it mercilessly, unable to find a single redeeming feature. Join us as we take a look at some titles that might have resolved this debate for good and possibly have given the 32X a bit more credibility. Originally printed in issue #2 of GameGo! Magazine, which never saw print, here is the article in its entirety, along with some gems from the SegaBase article on lost 32X titles.

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Sega Stars: Rieko Kodama

Sega Stars: Rieko Kodama

In an industry dominated by men, Rieko Kodama is a woman who has managed to make it all the way to the top, becoming one of the most respected designers of the last two decades. You may have seen her credited in a slew of titles as “Phoenix or Phenix Rie,” as she used that as her credit name until 1993. She is commonly referred to as “the First Lady of RPGs.” It’s a title that is well deserved, and we’ve compiled a short retrospective of her career.

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Genesis Accessory & Peripheral Guide

Genesis Accessory & Peripheral Guide

Like any other successful console, the Genesis had its fair share of peripherals. Here at Sega-16, we’ve tried to track down as many as possible. We’ll be adding more to this list as controllers, extensions, adapters, and other do-hickeys are found and documented. If you have any pics of items not featured here, feel free mention them here and we’ll make sure they’re included!

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Tech Talk: Connecting a 32X to A Sega CDX

Tech Talk: Connecting a 32X to A Sega CDX

Legend has it that the 32X and CDX are not compatible. We now know this to be false, and while connecting the two takes a bit of know-how and some effort, it can be done. To that end, we’ve compiled this handy guide for you to take you through the process step by step.

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Sega Stars: Tokuhiko “Bo” Uwabo

Sega Stars: Tokuhiko “Bo” Uwabo

The man who went by the names “Bo” and “Noah Toku” has an extensive gameography, spanning from 1986 to 1994. During that time frame, he was responsible for some of the most memorable music ever written for a game. When you think of the influence and popularity of most of the titles he worked on, it’s a mystery as to why he never got as much attention as other Sega wonder boys (no pun intended), like Yuji Naka and Yuzo Koshiro did.

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